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Thursday, May 1
 

7:00am

Registration & Hospitality Desk Open
Thursday May 1, 2014 7:00am - 6:00pm
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

They Didn’t Cover this in Library School: Applying Public Policy to Institutional Guidelines for Scholarly Communication and Fair Use
Instructors:
Brandon Butler, Practitioner-in-Residence, Glushko-Samuelson Intellectual Property Law Clinic, American University Washington College of Law
Christine Sundt, Editor of Visual Resources: An International Journal of Documentation
Gail Ravnitzky Silberglied, Vice President, Government Relations & Advocacy, American Alliance of Museums
Julia Blixrud, Assistant Executive Director, Scholarly Communication, Association of Research Libraries

Moderator:
Emilee Mathews, Research Librarian for Visual Arts, University of California, Irvine

Libraries are charged with preserving and maintaining access to information, yet rapid changes in public policy affecting fair use and scholarly communication makes writing and reviewing existing policies difficult, and advising creators and scholars on best practices in fair use in text and images complicated. However, institutions can directly affect public policy by interpreting their policies to privilege fair use, underlining core missions to further culture and learning.

Workshop participants will become more informed and empowered information citizens: they will learn key issues and current debates on fair use and public policy; examine and master issues through case study analysis and debate; start to develop or revise an existing institutional policy to be relevant and responsive, with input from speakers and fellow participants; and cultivate an outreach and advocacy toolkit to incorporate in their professional practice, including how to talk horizontally and vertically within their organization, and reach out to constituents. Speakers from the Association of Research Libraries, the College Art Association, and the American Alliance of Museums will provide invaluable expertise, guidance, and represent the diverse perspectives and concerns of ARLIS/NA members.

Maximum Participants: 20

Fee: $50

Thursday May 1, 2014 8:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Applying Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Graphics)
Instructors:
Ellen Cordes, Head of Technical Services, Lewis Walpole Library
Erin Blake, Head of Collection Information Services, Folger Shakespeare Library
Helena Zinkham, Chief of the Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Through lectures, visual aids, and in-class exercises, workshop participants will be introduced to and gain some practical experience in using Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Graphics), or DCRM(G), the successor to Elisabeth Betz Parker’s Graphic Materials: Rules for Describing Original Items and Historical Collections. The full-day workshop will focus on the descriptive portions of the bibliographic record, following the scope of DCRM(G), with special attention to instructions that are given new emphasis, such as transcription. In addition, it will cover creating records for illustrations within books, and creating group-level records. It is aimed at catalogers who have used Graphic Materials in the past, but is open to anyone with experience in MARC cataloging. Workshop participants will receive a spiral-bound copy of Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Graphics).

Note: Breakfast will be offered 8:00-8:30
Breakfast and refreshments will be provided for morning and afternoon breaks. Lunch will be on your own, with several dining options in the immediate area.

Maximum Participants: 20

Fee: $65 (includes morning and afternoon refreshments, and spiral-bound copy of DCRM)


Thursday May 1, 2014 8:00am - 5:00pm
Haskell Center, Folger Shakespeare Library 301 E. Capitol St. SE, Washington, DC, 20003

8:00am

Self-Schedule Room

Reservation on-site only

To reserve Self-Schedule Room, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Thursday May 1, 2014 8:00am - 6:00pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:30am

DC Cemetery Tour
Two famous DC cemeteries will be featured on this tour. Please wear comfortable shoes for this walking tour. The Congressional Cemetery was the premier burial ground for prominent 19th Century Washingtonians, and includes such highlights as Benjamin Latrobe’s cenotaphs, the tombstone of John Philip Sousa, the giant catalog card tombstone of current Library of Congress reference specialist Thomas Mann, and the Lummi 9/11 memorial totem poles. The Cemetery has recently instituted a book club with a taste for the macabre called “Tombs and Tomes!”

The Oak Hill Cemetery, which is hilly with narrow paths was built in 1848 under the direction of William Wilson Corcoran, founder of the Corcoran Gallery of Art. Many other prominent Washingtonians from the late 19th century are also interred here. They include James Renwick, Jr, one of the pre-eminent architects of the 19th century who designed the Cemetery’s chapel and iron gates, St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York, and the original Smithsonian Institution building. Also buried here is Adolph Cluss, the architect of Eastern Market, Paul J. Pelz, architect of the 1897 Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress, and many Senators and Representatives. From the Rock Creek Parkway below Oak Hill Cemetery several Gothic-style mausoleums can be seen tucked into the Georgetown hillside.

Maximum Participants: 20

Fee: $50

Accessibility: Hilly with narrow paths throughout, not wheelchair or walker device accessible.

Transportation: Transportation will be by bus. Loading and unloading takes place at the hotel’s 10th Street NW entrance, on 10th Street NW between H Street NW and G Street NW. The bus for this tour will leave at 8:30am. Please meet the tour shepherd near the 10th street hotel entrance 15 minutes prior to departure.


Thursday May 1, 2014 8:30am - 12:00pm
Congressional Cemetery and Oak Hill Cemetery 1801 E St SE, District of Columbia ‎

8:45am

Hey Hon: Baltimore's Best Arts and Culture
The American Visionary Art Museum features Outsider art, which is described as “art produced by self-taught individuals, usually without formal training, whose works arise from an innate personal vision that revels foremost in the creative art itself.” The permanent collections and temporary exhibitions are a mecca for forward-looking artistic innovators, optimists, dreamers and doers. A docent-led tour of the AVAM will include time to explore the collections (or the unusual gift shop.) Browse the permanent collections, or view the current exhibition Human, Soul & Machine: The Coming Singularity! – a playful look at the impact of technology as seen through the eyes of 40+ visionary artists, cutting edge futurists, and inventors. Lunch will be on your own in Baltimore’s Hampden neighborhood, which has many quirky restaurants and stores including Atomic Books, where filmmaker John Waters picks up his mail. (His film Pecker was set and filmed in this area.) A list of restaurants and notable neighborhood finds will be distributed.

From there part of the group will visit the Baltimore Museum of Art and part of the group will visit the Walters Art Museum. Please note: you will be asked to specify which museum you wish to visit on the registration form.

The Baltimore Museum of Art is home of the Cone Collection of Modern Art which consists of works by Matisse, Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, and Vincent van Gogh, as well as a variety of textiles, jewelry, furniture, and African, Asian, and Near Eastern art. Participants will receive a docent-led tour of the library, archives, and paper conservation lab, as well as current exhibitions which include German Expressionism: A Revolutionary Spirit, Black Box: Camille Henrot, Front Room: Sterling Ruby, and On Paper: Figure Drawings from the Benesch Collection. Participants will have time at the end of the day to view the Cone Collection, the Sculpture Gardens, or to visit the gift shop.

The Walters Art Museum is internationally renowned for its collection of art, which was amassed by William and Henry Walters and bequeathed to the City of Baltimore in 1931. The permanent collection includes ancient art, medieval art and manuscripts, decorative objects, Asian art, and Old Master and 19th-century paintings. This tour will focus on book-related aspects of the collection with a curator-led tour of the current exhibition Bookbindings from the Gilded Age, a behind-the scenes look at the museum’s art research library and archives, and a visit inside the vault that houses 925 medieval illuminated manuscripts, 1,200 incunabula, and significant holdings of rare books printed after 1500. Free time will be left to explore the galleries at the conclusion of the tour. 

Maximum Participants: 55

Fee: $75

Accessibility: All participants will be walking or standing for the duration of the tour. There are stairs, ramps, and elevators, and limited seating in galleries.

Transportation: Transportation is by bus. Loading and unloading takes place at the hotel’s 10th Street NW entrance, on 10th Street NW between H Street NW and G Street NW. The bus for this tour will leave at 8:45am. Please meet the tour shepherd near the 10th street hotel entrance 15 minutes prior to departure.


Thursday May 1, 2014 8:45am - 6:00pm
Baltimore, MD 800 Key Hwy, Baltimore, MD

9:00am

Executive Board Breakfast
Thursday May 1, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am
Room: Constitution Ballroom D Grand Hyatt Washington 1000 H Street NW Washington DC

9:30am

Society of the Cincinnati Tour

The Society of the Cincinnati welcomes attendees of the ARLIS/NA Washington conference for a special tour of our library and museum. The Society of the Cincinnati was founded at the close of the Revolutionary War by the officers of the Continental Army and their French counterparts who had fought together in struggle for American independence. Perpetuated by the descendants of the original officers, the Society is today a non-profit educational organization dedicated to the study and preservation of the history of the American Revolution. The Society maintains a special collections library and museum at its headquarters, Anderson House, a Beaux-Arts mansion that was formerly the home of a member. On view in the library will be treasures from the vault, including George Washington’s copy of Benjamin West’s A Discourse, Delivered to the Students of the Royal Academy (London, 1793) and Pierre L’Enfant’s original drawings for the insignia of the Society. There will also be a guided tour of the first and second floors of Anderson House, which showcase the rich collections of art and artifacts assembled by Larz and Isabel Anderson during the first third of the twentieth century. Also on view is the Society current special exhibition, "The Reward of Patriotism": Commemorating America’s Heroes of the War of 1812.

Maximum Participants: 20

Fee: Free

Accessibility: Walking and standing

Transportation: Please meet the tour shepherd near the 10th street hotel entrance 15 minutes prior to departure. Take the Metro's red line ($2.10 with SmarTrip card, $3.10 with paper card from Metro Center) to the Dupont Circle station (Q Street/North exit). At the top of the escalators, turn left on Q Street. In one block, turn left toward Massachusetts Avenue. Anderson House is across the street, to the right. Alternately, Metrobuses D2, D4, D6, N1, N2, N3, and G2 stop within one block of Anderson House.

NOTE: Due to the late addition of this tour, attendees must use this form to register:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1EXVpqKtfR4rQWzOJ0hvIfa0Deu2Mlo8JiXDEvKsA0AU/viewform?usp=send_form


Thursday May 1, 2014 9:30am - 11:45am
Society of the Cincinnati 2118 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20008

9:45am

Hillwood Estate, Museum, and Garden
Hillwood Estate, Museum, and Gardens was purchased by Marjorie Merriweather Post in 1955. Her estate endowed the country with the most comprehensive collection of Russian imperial art outside of Russia, including over 400 chalices and a collection of Faberge that includes an Imperial Easter Egg. The 18th century decorative art collections include extensive French furniture and many exquisite sets and pieces of Sevres Porcelain. The dining room table, commissioned in 1927, was originally designed for Mar-a-Lago, the lavish Palm Beach estate Post built with her second husband, E.F. Hutton. The table, made in Florence Italy, seats thirty and has a mosaic top containing eleven different stones.

Tour participants will be able to wander through Hillwood’s superb setting which has 25 acres of landscaped gardens, water features, natural woodlands, and a greenhouse filled with orchids. Participants will receive tours of the mansion and of the gardens, and will enjoy a catered lunch in the CW Post Room, adjacent to the Café. There will also be a chance to view the current exhibition Catherine the Great’s Art Patronage.

Maximum Participants: 54

Fee: $70, includes lunch

Accessibility: Walking, some benches, limited seating on tours. Stairs, ramps, and hilly sections, not rigorous.

Transportation: Transportation will be by bus. Loading and unloading takes place at the hotel’s 10th Street NW entrance, on 10th Street NW between H Street NW and G Street NW. The bus for this tour will leave at 9:45am. Please meet the tour shepherd near the 10th street hotel entrance 15 minutes prior to departure.


Thursday May 1, 2014 9:45am - 2:45pm
Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens 4155 Linnean Ave NW, Washington, DC

10:00am

ARLIS/NA Executive Board Pre-conference Meeting
Thursday May 1, 2014 10:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Constitution Ballroom E Grand Hyatt Washington 1000 H Street NW Washington DC

10:00am

Incorporating Technology: Apps for Reference and Teaching in Art and Architecture Libraries
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Instructor: 
Cathryn Ziefle, Librarian, Woodbury University; Lucy Campbell, Librarian, New School of Architecture and Design

We live in an interactive world where we discover and share our information via technology, meaning librarians are no longer limited to books and databases. Instead, architecture, urban studies and augmented reality apps can help us answer reference questions, assist in instruction, and create a more interactive library of the future. This workshop will be an extension of Cathryn Ziefle's lightning talk presentation at the 2013 AASL conference in San Francisco, CA, "Isn't There an App for That?" It will expand by highlighting the features of top apps related to art, architecture, urban design, photography, and academia. It is designed around visual media and encourages attendees to participate with their own tablets or mobile devices (not required). Participants will share the apps they use and how they have incorporated them into their libraries; and groups will brainstorm ways that apps can be incorporated into reference and teaching. The workshop hosts will share their experiences with using mobile technology and apps at the reference desk and in the classroom. Participants will walk away with a clear understanding of popular apps for art, architecture, urban design, photography, and academia. They will be able to incorporate apps into reference and instruction. Above all, they will be inspired to use tablets and more technology in their libraries.

Maximum Participants:
40

Fee:
$50

Thursday May 1, 2014 10:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

12:00pm

Executive Board Luncheon
Thursday May 1, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room: Constitution Ballroom D Grand Hyatt Washington 1000 H Street NW Washington DC

1:00pm

ARLIS/NA Executive Board Pre-conference Meeting
Thursday May 1, 2014 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Room: Constitution Ballroom E Grand Hyatt Washington 1000 H Street NW Washington DC

1:00pm

ARLIS/NA Yearlong Career Mentoring Program
Instructors:
Anna Simon, Research and Instruction Librarian, Georgetown University Library and chair of the Mentoring Subcommittee
Heather Slania, Director of the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center, National Museum of Women in the Arts

The ARLIS/NA Subcommittee on Mentoring seeks to facilitate mentoring among members by pairing emerging and established professionals together to provide them with the tools and support to carry out a successful mentoring relationship. To this end, the 9th annual workshop is the catalyst for the ARLIS/NA year-long Career Mentoring Program. The workshop purpose is to provide the training tools necessary to create and maintain a successful mentoring relationship throughout the upcoming year.

The four-hour workshop is loosely modeled on the 2005 ARLIS/NA Mentoring Program workshop led by Margaret Law, associate director of the University of Alberta Learning Services. Two presenters lead the workshop, which is divided into sections for mentees, mentors, and the combined group. The presentation includes an introduction to mentoring; characteristics of mentors, mentees, and the mentoring relationship; realistic goal-setting; appropriate behavior and expectations; methods of communication; and benefits and potential pitfalls of mentoring. The presentation style is through PowerPoint, discussion, group-work, and independent writing exercises.

In order to facilitate optimal matching of mentor/mentee pairs, a short application form must be submitted prior to the annual conference.

NOTE: Attendance at this workshop is a requirement for participation in the year-long ARLIS/NA Career Mentoring Program.

Maximum Participants: 24

Fee: This workshop is free.

Thursday May 1, 2014 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Room: Constitution Ballroom D Grand Hyatt Washington 1000 H Street NW Washington DC

1:00pm

Bookings: Making Makerspaces for Artists Books
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Instructors:

Ann Kalmbach, Executive Director, Women's Studio Workshop
Tatana Kellner, Artistic Director, Women's Studio Workshop
Gretchen Schermerhorn, Artistic Director, Pyramid Atlantic Art Center
Susan Chute, Archival Collections Consultant, WSW
Sandra Brown, WSW and MLIS Candidate, SUNY Albany

Moderators:
Susan Chute, Archival Consultant, WSW
Sandra Brown, Office Manager, WSW and MLIS Candidate, SUNY Albany

This workshop, presented by the Artistic Directors and Librarians of Women's Studio Workshop and hosted by Pyramid Atlantic Arts Center, will address the evolution of Library as Place by offering participants hands-on experience in conducting MakerSpace sessions focusing on the creation of handmade artists’ books. Participants will each create an artist’s book while learning strategies to sponsor bookmaking sessions in their own libraries and workspaces. Specific attention will be devoted to developing thematic content; we'll use the changing library landscape as a prompt. Possible topics include the decline of the book in a physical form; the widespread dispersion of personal information through social media; the definition of library community; the demonization of people who democratize the spread of proprietary information (Aaron Swartz, Chelsea Manning, Edward J. Snowden); the dilemma of complying with FISA requests and National Security Letters; the legitimacy of information in a knowledge landscape where anyone can publish; and adaptive reuse of artistic work. Participants will leave the workshop with an artist’s book of their own making, using monoprinting and other practical printing techniques. They will also come away with a blueprint for building community and advocating for libraries by designing creative, collaborative MakerSpaces focused around the book. Registration includes a materials fee.

Maximum Participants: 15

Fee: $65 (includes materials fee)

Thursday May 1, 2014 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Pyramid Atlantic Art Center 8230 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring MD 20910

1:00pm

We're Here to Help: An Introduction to the NEH Funding Opportunities for Digital Projects 
Instructors:
Perry Collins, Senior Program Office, Office of Digital Humanities, NEH
David Weinstein, Senior Program Officer, Division of Public Programs, NEH
Mary Downs, Senior Program Officer, Division of Preservation and Access, NEH
Jennifer Serventi, Senior Program Officer, Office of Digital Humanities, NEH

Moderator:
Jennifer Serventi, Senior Program Officer, Office of Digital Humanities, NEH

Presented by officers from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), this workshop will provide an opportunity for participants to learn more about grant opportunities from the NEH that support digital humanities projects, from planning for sustainable digitization efforts; to undertaking innovative humanities efforts that explore new uses of digital technologies; to using existing digital platforms and applications for engaging new, particularly public, audiences with humanities questions and themes. The first half of the workshop will be an introduction to the resources and grant programs of the Endowment, led by NEH program officers. Ample time will be allotted during this half for questions from and discussion with the audience.

The second half of the workshop will be two mock panels that will give workshop participants a sense of the peer review process employed by the Endowment. Before the conference, the organizers will ask for 10 of the workshop registrants to volunteer as mock grant reviewers. The volunteers will be provided with materials from a sample application to review before the workshop so that they can serve on the mock panel. After the mock panels, the presenters will respond to questions from all workshop participants about the NEH review process.

Maximum Participants: 40

Fee: $30 (Fee reflects the Association's overhead, and not a fee charged by the NEH.)

Thursday May 1, 2014 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Room: Constitution Ballroom C Grand Hyatt

1:15pm

A Modern and Contemporary Art Paradise: Glenstone Museum
**REGISTRATION FOR THIS TOUR IS FULL** (4/25/2014)

Glenstone’s
permanent collection comprises iconic paintings, sculptures, works on paper, photographs, installations, and multimedia works by post World War II artists. Mitchell Rales and his wife, Emily, began collecting art in 1990 with an eye toward charting the most significant historical shifts in how art has been seen and understood in our time.

The museum building was designed by architect Charles Gwathmey to work in concert with avant garde art. Landscape architects Peter Walker and Partners gently reshaped, reconceived, and restored this 200-acre estate--nestled in a distant D.C. suburb--into a breathtaking setting for quiet, aesthetic contemplation of Glenstone’s impressive collection of outdoor sculpture, including works by Jeff Koons, Richard Serra, and Andy Goldsworthy. Dedication to organic landscape maintenance has also made Glenstone a model for sustainable agriculture and environmental management. Representing international artistic innovation, the collection has unique concentrations of work, which often exemplify an artist's career at its height.

A large museum building planned to house the permanent collection is under construction, but the original, more intimate, extant museum space hosts long term rotating exhibitions. The current exhibition showcases Glenstone’s collection of works by the Swiss artist duo Peter Fischli and David Weiss. Participants will receive a docent led tour as well as a presentation by the librarian and archivist. Read more about the collection in this New York Times article, "Like half the National Gallery in your own back yard."

Maximum Participants: 15

Fee: Free

Accessibility: Walking and standing, limited number of benches.

Transportation: Transportation will be by bus. Loading and unloading takes place at the hotel’s 10th Street NW entrance, on 10th Street NW between H Street NW and G Street NW. The bus for this tour will leave at 1:15pm. Please meet the tour shepherd near the 10th street hotel entrance 15 minutes prior to departure.


Thursday May 1, 2014 1:15pm - 4:45pm
Glenstone Museum 12002 Glen Rd, Potomac, MD

1:45pm

Artful Archives
**REGISTRATION FOR THIS TOUR IS FULL** (4/25/2014)

The nearby Archives of American Art was begun in 1954 to serve as a microfilm repository of papers housed in other institutions. This mission expanded to collecting and preserving original material and, in 1970, the Archives joined the Smithsonian Institution, sharing the Institution’s mandate—the increase and diffusion of knowledge. Today the Archives is the world’s pre-eminent and most widely used research center dedicated to collecting, preserving, and providing access to primary sources that document the history of the visual arts in America. The collections consist of more than 20 million letters, diaries and scrapbooks of artists, dealers, and collectors; manuscripts of critics and scholars; business and financial records of museums, galleries, schools, and associations; photographs, sketches and sketchbooks; rare printed material; film, audio and video recordings; and the largest collection of oral histories anywhere on the subject of art.

This tour to the Archives of American Art will showcase three units within the AAA. Reference archivist Elizabeth Botten will give a sneak peek of the exhibition she curated, Artists and their Models; Head of Information Systems Karen Weiss will give a tour of digitization equipment and workflow within the Archives, and Archivist Erin Kinhart will talk about collections processing practices.

Maximum Participants: 45

Fee: Free

Accessibility:
Walking and standing.

Transportation: The group will walk around the corner to the Archives of American Art, leaving at 1:45pm. Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby 15 minutes before departure.

Note: You must bring a photo ID with you to sign in at the front desk in the lobby and receive a visitor's sticker before proceeding to the second floor. The Archives of American Art is in Suite 2200.


Thursday May 1, 2014 1:45pm - 4:15pm
Archives of American Art 750 9th Street NW, Suite 2200, Washington DC

4:30pm

Distinguished Service Award Committee

Chair: Susan Craig


Thursday May 1, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: Constitution Ballroom E Grand Hyatt Washington 1000 H Street NW Washington DC

6:00pm

Society Circle Event
Tony Podesta, dubbed "one of DC's 'fifty heavy lifters'" by the Financial Times, works as political strategist for the Democratic Party as the head of his K Street lobbying firm. In his spare time, you can find him at art fairs and gallery openings shopping for superior examples of contemporary art that fill his home in D.C.'s historic Kalorama neighborhood. Mr. Podesta invites members of the Society Circle to explore his four-story residence and it's collection of contemporary paintings, prints and sculpture including work by Marina Abramovic, Louise Bourgeois, Antony Gormley, and Olafur Eliasson. The event is by invitation only for Society Circle members.

Attendance at the Society Circle Reception is by invitation only. If you have not donated to this year's Society Circle you may do so later in this registration form.

Transportation:
Mr. Podesta’s home is at least a half mile walk from any public transportation, but the stroll takes you though the picturesque Kalorama neighborhood, with beautiful houses including the French ambassador’s residence. If you are averse to walking, taking a taxi is encouraged. 
Address and exact directions via public transportation will be shared with invitees prior to the event.
 

Thursday May 1, 2014 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Home of Tony Podesta Kalorama neighborhood, DC
 
Friday, May 2
 

7:00am

Registration & Hospitality Desk Open
Friday May 2, 2014 7:00am - 6:30pm
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Self-Schedule Room

Reservation on-site only

To reserve Self-Schedule Room, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Friday May 2, 2014 8:00am - 4:30pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:00am

Postcards from the Edge VII: Arts Management
Instructors:
Kimberly Detterbeck, Art Librarian, Purchase College (SUNY)
Michael Matos, Assistant Librarian, American University Library

Arts Management is a young, rapidly growing discipline and profession that requires its practitioners and scholars to not only be well-versed in the visual and performing arts, but also to be skilled in various aspects of business, law, communication, and technology. As stated by the Association of Arts Administration Educators, “managers and administrative leaders of arts organizations provide a bridge between art, artists, and audiences. They combine the tools of business—management, marketing, financial accounting, operations, negotiation—with the tools of community-building—fundraising, development, education, outreach, volunteerism, partnership—to make thriving and vital spaces for arts and culture.” The seventh "Postcards from the Edge" workshop will emphasize these aspects of arts management that fall outside the confines of the arts, and delve into the research methods and resources that arts managers and administrators employ in the field and in the academy.

This hands-on workshop exemplifies the mission of the Postcards from the Edge series in that the resources covered and demonstrated are not “art” resources that art librarians are commonly called upon to collect, use, and integrate into teaching and learning. Attendees will learn the history, issues, and trends within arts management and gain familiarity and experience with fundamental print and electronic resources in the field.  The audience for this workshop is information professionals (librarians, visual resource center faculty and staff, and archivist) who serve arts management departments at their institutions. Additionally information professionals who work at art institutions who employ arts managers such as theaters, dance companies, art educational institutions, and museums (of which Washington, D.C. has many) are especially encouraged to attend and share their own experiences.

Maximum Participants: 30

Fee: $50

Friday May 2, 2014 9:00am - 12:00am
American University, Bender Library, Graduate Research Classroom (Rm. B60) 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016

9:15am

The Diplomatic Reception Rooms at the Department of State

**REGISTRATION FOR THIS TOUR IS FULL** (4/25/2014)

Attendees will travel by Metro to the Diplomatic Reception Rooms of the Department of State, which are used for official functions hosted by the Secretary of State and other government officials. The Diplomatic Rooms hold a premier collection of early 18th and 19th century American furniture, paintings and decorative arts, and are reputed to be one of the top ten collections from the time of our country’s founding and of its formative years. The museum-caliber collection boasts more than 5,000 objects from the period of 1750-1825. Participants will be treated to a tour of the rooms and their objects which include portraits, landscape paintings, and American Queen Anne and Chippendale furniture, furniture by John Townsend and John Goddard of Newport, Rhode Island, and silver by Paul Revere and many other exquisite objects.

Please note: Because no transportation is being furnished for this tour, participants will pay only for Metro transportation. A second tour which includes a visit to the Federal Reserve Board and to the Diplomatic Rooms at the Department of State on Monday, May 5 will travel by bus. Costs associated with the May 5 tour cover bus transportation. No Social Security numbers will be collected for the May 2 tour.  
 
Maximum Participants: 20

Fee: Free, except cost of metro transportation

Transportation: Participants on this tour will take Metro, and will walk approximately ½ mile to and from Metro and the Department of State for this tour. The smartrip metro fare is $2.10 each way. Paper metro card is $3.10 each way. Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby 15 minutes prior to departure.


Friday May 2, 2014 9:15am - 11:45am
Diplomatic Reception Rooms at the Department of State 2201 C St NW, Washington, DC 20520

9:30am

The Phillips Collection
Take Metro's red line from the hotel to the Dupont Circle neighborhood for DC's most intimate home for modern and contemporary art, The Phillips Collection. Opened to the public in 1921 and partially housed in the founder's family brownstone, the Phillips is home to beloved works such as Renoir's The Luncheon of the Boating Party, the Rothko room (designed to Rothko's specifications), and the Laib Wax Room. The current and extensive exhibition, Made in the USA, features more than 200 works by over 120 artists and will occupy nearly two-thirds of the museum’s galleries. Artists include Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, Richard Diebenkorn, Arthur Dove, Edward Hopper, Jacob Lawrence, John Marin, Robert Motherwell, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mark Rothko, John Sloan, Clyfford Still, and many others. After a tour of the exhibition, the group will have time to see other works in the permanent collection or visit the gift shop.

Maximum Participants: 20

Fee: $5.00

Transportation: Transportation will be by Metro's red line from Metro Center to Dupont Circle, exiting at the Q Street exit (front of the train). Fare will be $2.10 outgoing (peak fare) and $1.70 on return. Walk one block down Q Street to the left to the corner of 21st and Q Streets, and enter the museum mid-block. Allow 15 minutes for the trip. Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby 15 minutes prior to departure.

Tour group should be gathered at the museum entrance at 9:55 am. Breakfast in the neighborhood is encouraged either at the communal table at Le Pain Quotidien at 20th and P Streets NW or coffee and pastries from Firehook Bakery at Connecticut Ave and Q Street NW, eaten in Dupont Circle Park.


Friday May 2, 2014 9:30am - 11:15am
The Phillips Collection 1600 21st Street NW, Washington DC 20009

9:30am

Folger Shakespeare Library
**REGISTRATION FOR THIS TOUR IS FULL** (4/25/2014)

Celebrating Shakespeare’s 450th Birthday in 2014, the Folger Shakespeare Library is home to the world’s largest and finest collection of Shakespeare materials. The Folger Shakespeare Library houses approximately 260,000 books, 60,000 manuscripts, 250,000 playbills, and more than 90,000 works of art as well as musical instruments and costumes. The strength of the collections are materials on William Shakespeare and the theater up to the present day, and early modern materials in the West from 1450 until the mid1700s. Many of the Shakespeare materials were originally acquired by Henry and Emily Folger.

Since opening in 1932 the Folger has continued to acquire significant holdings that make it a world-class research center on the early modern age. Acquisitions continue for all parts of the collections. Highlights include the Elizabethan Theater, the Library’s Reading Room, and the Great Hall, which will house a special exhibition titled Shakespeare’s the Thing. The exhibition emphasizes Shakespeare’s influence on visual art, performance, and scholarship with items selected by Folger staff, including a look at how fans have celebrated Shakespeare from his time to ours. The tour will include information about the history and operations of the Folger Shakespeare Library, a discussion of digital initiatives, a glimpse at the conservation or photography lab, and a visit to the Folger Reading Room.

Maximum Participants: 25

Fee: Free

Accessibility: Walking and standing.

Transportation: The group will take Metro to this tour, and will leave at 9:30am. Fare is $1.70 or $2.10 each way depending on rush hour. Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby 15 minutes prior to departure.


Friday May 2, 2014 9:30am - 12:00pm
Folger Shakespeare Library 201 East Capitol St SE, Washington, DC

9:30am

National Gallery of Art Imaging Studio: Behind the Scenes

The National Gallery of Art was conceived and given to the people of the United States by financier and art collector Andrew W. Mellon. In 1936 Mellon wrote to President Franklin D. Roosevelt offering to donate his superb art collection for a new museum and to use his own funds to construct a building for its use. With the president’s support, Congress accepted Mellon’s gift, which included a sizable endowment, and established the National Gallery of Art in March 1937.

The state-of-the art Imaging and Visual Resources painting studio brings the National Gallery of Art's collection to the world. Using a motorized easel and advanced computer controls, The Department of Visual Imaging captures images of paintings in precise sections – with accuracy within five hundredths of an inch. The image sections are merged into an ultra high resolution digital composite that provides extraordinary detail revealing small brushstrokes and hairline cracks which are hard to see even in our galleries. These images are currently featured in the Google Art project, the Gallery’s website, and NGA Images, a leading museum open access web resource. NGA Images contains more than 35,000 high-resolution publication-ready digital images free of charge for immediate download and any use. The tour will last about 45 minutes after which additional time is allotted for browsing the museum galleries and shops. Visit images.nga.gov for a preview.

Maximum participants: 20

Accessibility: Walking and standing

Transportation: Transportation will be by Metro Bus, P6 route. Fare is $3.20 ($1.60 each way with Smartrip card). Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby 15 minutes prior to departure.

Fee: Free


Friday May 2, 2014 9:30am - 12:00pm
National Gallery of Art 6th and Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC ‎

9:30am

National Gallery of Art: Highlights from the Permanent Collection
The National Gallery of Art was conceived and given to the people of the United States by financier and art collector Andrew W. Mellon. In 1936 Mellon wrote to President Franklin D. Roosevelt offering to donate his superb art collection for a new museum and to use his own funds to construct a building for its use. With the president’s support, Congress accepted Mellon’s gift, which included a sizable endowment, and established the National Gallery of Art in March 1937. Mellon selected American architect John Russell Pope to design a beaux arts edifice for the new museum now known as the West Building. Spend the morning exploring its elegantly designed galleries, either on a tour of the American or French Galleries. The visit will allow for an hour of time on your own to explore the museum.

American Galleries

This tour will be led by Associate Curator in the Department of American and British Paintings, Charles Brock. You will see examples from Mellon’s original gift, such as Gilbert Stuart’s The Skater, as well as works by Thomas Cole, James McNeill Whistler, George Bellows, and John Singleton Copley. The visit will allow for time to explore the museum or shop in one of NGA’s many gift shops.

French Galleries

This tour will be led by Assistant Curator in the Department of French Paintings, Yuriko Jackall. With rooms devoted to 18th century masters like Fragonard, Watteau, and Greuze, participants will move to the newly rehung galleries dedicated to the 19th century where paintings are arranged by theme, and beautifully display outstanding paintings by Edouard Manet, Pablo Picasso, Paul Gauguin and other major works by leading impressionist, post-impressionist, and modern artists. The visit will allow for time to explore the museum or shop in one of NGA’s many gift shops.

Accessibility: Walking and standing

Transportation: Transportation will be by Metro Bus, P6 route. Fare is $3.20 ($1.60 each way). Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby 15 minutes prior to departure.

Fee: Free 


Friday May 2, 2014 9:30am - 12:00pm
National Gallery of Art 6th and Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC ‎

10:00am

Behind-the-Scenes Lace and Quilts Tour
A behind-the-scenes Lace and Quilts Tour of the collections storage areas of the National Museum of American History.The group will be divided in two and each group of 8 will see both the lace and the quilt collections.

Maximum Participants: 16

Fee: Free

Accessibility: Walking and standing

Transportation: Transportation will be by Metro’s Blue and Orange line from Metro Center to the Federal Triangle Station. The Smartrip Metro fare is $2.10 outgoing (peak fare until 9:30am) and $1.70 on return. Paper Metro card is $3.10 outgoing, and $2.70 on return. Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby at 9:15am. Tour shepherd will depart at 9:30am.

NOTE: If you have already registered for the conference and want to add a tour, you must contact ARLIS Customer Care Center to have your registration amended.

Customer Care Center (website access and conference registration)
Hours: Monday to Thursday (7:00AM-7:00PM Central) and Friday (7:00AM-3:30PM Central)
Contact: 800-817-0621 ext. 450, 414-908-4954 ext. 450
customercare@arlisna.org

 



Friday May 2, 2014 10:00am - 12:00pm
National Museum of American History 14th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, D.C., 20001

11:00am

Auction Catalog SIG
Coordinators: Erika Hauser, Prima Casetta

Friday May 2, 2014 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

11:00am

Book Arts SIG
Coordinators: Michelle Strizever, Amanda Meeks

Friday May 2, 2014 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Wilson Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

11:00am

Cinema & Media Studies SIG
Coordinators: Nedda Ahmend, Lea Whittington

Friday May 2, 2014 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Roosevelt Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

11:00am

Decorative Arts SIG
Friday May 2, 2014 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Washington Board Room Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

11:00am

Teaching SIG
Coordinators: Jamie Vander Broek, Chizu Morihara

Friday May 2, 2014 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

11:30am

Capitol Projects: Three Washington Image Collections Go Digital
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

The Kress Historic Negatives Digitization Project at the National Gallery of Art - Melissa Lemke, Image Specialist for Italian Art, Department of Image Collections, National Gallery of Art Library
IC + FA: Using Metadata to United Photograph and Archival Collections - Shalimar Fojas White, Manager, Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection
The Carol M. Highsmith Archive: A Case Study in Providing Timely Public Access to Contemporary Born-digital Photographs via an Online Catalog - Brett Carnell, Acting Head, Technical Services Section, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Moderator:
Katherine Cowan, Senior Reference Librarian, Maryland Institute College of Art

Missy Lemke will discuss the National Gallery of Art Department of Image Collections’ work with the Kress Collection of Historic Images. In addition to the histories of the objects themselves, these images and supporting materials tell the fascinating story of Samuel Kress’s collecting practices, including the role of prominent art historians and conservators. A grant from the Kress Foundation facilitated the scanning, cataloguing and physical preservation of this important archive. This talk will highlight examples from the collection which shed light on the Kress story and its significance for modern art history.

Shalimar Fojas White will present about the problems inherent to mixed collections like those of the Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) at Dumbarton Oaks, which include both extensive photographic and fieldwork collections. The presentation will describe the selection of a collection management system (CMS) that will serve as an integrated data repository, and outline the challenges of incorporating two different metadata schemas and importing disparate legacy datasets into the same database. It will also outline the commonalities and differences in professional practice among art information professionals, and how systems and metadata can be used to integrate related collections that are often managed by different units within the same institution. In addition, the paper will describe the potential for an aggregated dataset for mixed collections to be repurposed for further online distribution.

Brett Carnell’s presentation will focus on the Carol M. Highsmith Archive. The Library of Congress currently provides access through its online catalog to over 22,000 of Highsmith’s rights-free photographs documenting America. Starting with Highsmith’s first submission of digital images in 2002 the Library developed and then has continuously refined practices to efficiently deliver high quality photographs to the public. The work has involved creating methods for facilitating and tracking the rapid inflow of thousands of images, manipulating metadata provided by the photographer to create catalog records, and managing digital files.

Friday May 2, 2014 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room: Latrobe Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

11:30am

Collaborative Projects in Open Access: Enhancing Discoverability of Your Collections via the Digital Public Library of America
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Getting Users the Things they Want: Open Access, Artstor and DPLA - Gregg A. Silvis, Associate University Librarian for Information Technology and Digital Initiatives, University of Delaware Library

Making Collections Information Go: Different Forms of Sharing for Open Access - Kate Blanch, Administrator, Museum Databases, The Walters Art Museum

How Open Access Makes Free Global Learning Possible - Beth Harris, Dean, Art and History, Khan Academy and Steven Zucker, Dean, Art and History, Khan Academy

Moderators:
Siân Evans, Implementation Manager, Artstor
Ian McDermott, Collection Development Manager, Artstor

Open access content is one of higher education’s most pressing topics, from sharing image and print collections to massive online open courses (MOOCs). To this end, the Digital Public Library of America (www.dp.la) launched in April 2013 with the ambitious goal of making the nation’s museum, library, and archival collections freely available online. To date, dozens of institutions are participating by sharing their content through a network of service and content hubs that aggregate and share content with DPLA. The collection building model for DPLA relies on these hubs to aggregate large batches of content that are subsequently harvested by DPLA.

This panel will explore Artstor’s work as a DPLA content hub for museum content and its plans to enable libraries to share their special collections with DPLA via Shared Shelf, as well as other collaborative open access projects taking place at the institutions represented. The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore will speak to their longstanding commitment to making their collections available on the open Web on their own website, DPLA, and Wikimedia Commons. University of Delaware Library has published numerous special collections in Shared Shelf Commons, an open access portal that contains content for Shared Shelf subscribers; this content will soon be made available to DPLA, thereby increasing access to academic special collections through one search portal. Additionally, Beth Harris and Steven Zucker of smARThistory, a leading open access resource for art history, will discuss their plans to use DPLA content, and other open access content, in their open educational resources.

Recorded Session Available Summer 2014


Friday May 2, 2014 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

11:30am

Fair Use/Fair Game: Intellectual Property and the Visual Arts
Sponsored by Society Circle

Speakers:

Visual Arts: Copyright Registration, Problems, and Proposed Solutions - Robert J. Kasunic, Associate Register of Copyrights and Director of Registration Policy, U.S. Copyright Office
The CAA Fair Use Project - Angelica Das, Associate Director, Center for Media & Social Impact, School of Communication, American University
Untangling the Ethics and Copyright of Appropriation Art in an Age of Piracy  - Alexander Watkins, Art & Architecture Librarian, University of Colorado Boulder

Moderator:
Amanda Bowen, Head of Collections, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University

Art information and visual resources professionals continue to play a crucial role in educating artists, researchers, and professional colleagues about the nuances of copyright and fair use, as well as the ethical considerations as they apply to visual materials in education, publishing, and artistic expression.

This session brings practitioners and experts together to address three important aspects of image use in the visual arts. The ease of finding and reproducing images often obscures the complex legal issues; fair-use “best practices” guidelines have become one way to illuminate strategies for working within existing and changing copyright laws. What is legal under fair use, however, is not always ethical, and this session will address the state of current requirements for registering visual materials for copyright protection; issues of originality, cultural appropriation, and socioeconomic inequality as aspects of image use; and the ongoing development of new guidelines for using images for instruction and publishing.

Friday May 2, 2014 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

11:30am

Meet the Policy Experts
Sponsored by Society Circle

Speakers:

Libby Dechman, Policy Specialist for Art and Kate James, Policy Specialist for RDA, Policy and Standards Division, Library of Congress

Moderator:
Alison Larson, Art Reference/Weekend Operations Librarian, Crouch Fine Arts Library, Baylor University

FRBR has changed how we think about bibliographic records, and RDA has changed how we approach descriptive cataloging. Library of Congress Policy and Standards Division staff have answered thousands of questions from LC staff and the wider cataloging world seeking direction and clarification. In this informal session, two policy experts from the Policy and Standards Division will provide updates on RDA developments at LC and recent changes in descriptive and subject cataloging policy that impact the art community. Time will be allotted for questions and answers.

Friday May 2, 2014 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room: Burnham Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:00pm

Chapter Chairs Roundtable
Coordinator: Sarah Sherman

By invitation only. 

Friday May 2, 2014 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:00pm

OCLC Research Library Partnership Roundtable Luncheon
The meeting is open to staff at OCLC RLP member institutions, and to prospective members. Capacity limited to 100.

Friday May 2, 2014 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Fashion, Textile, Costume SIG
Coordinator: Sandra J. Ley

Friday May 2, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Wilson Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Interlibrary Loan SIG
Coordinator: Elizabeth Lane

Friday May 2, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Stimulating Creativity in Practice SIG
Friday May 2, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Roosevelt Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Urban Planning SIG
Coordinator: Marsha Taichman

Friday May 2, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Collecting Outside the Mainstream: Alternative Avenues for Library Collections
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Erin Dunigan, Sales & Marking Associate, D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers
Julia Klein, Publisher, Soberscove Press
David Senior, Bibliographer, The Museum of Modern Art Library
Brian Cassidy, Independent Bookseller, Silver Spring, MD

Moderators:
Amy Ballmer, Assistant Head of Research and Instructional Services, Gladys Marcus Library, Fashion Institute of Technology
Melanie Emerson, Head of Reader Services  Ryerson & Burnham Libraries, The Art Institute of Chicago  Chicago, IL

There is growing agreement in the art library community that homogonous collections do not reflect the interests and experiences of our diverse community of researchers, students and artists. Small press, indie, and artists’ publications strengthen collections and support research through the alternative voices, practices, and experiences they present.  But how can we effectively integrate small publishers into collection development and acquisitions workflow? Publishers and authors need to know the best way to connect with librarians and make their books easy to purchase considering the byzantine and restrictive purchasing processes many libraries must go through. Alternatively, librarians and other Acquisition staff members need the freedom to move beyond traditional approval plans and attend book fairs and explore venues that allow direct access to those producing and distributing these unique materials in the US and abroad.    

Speakers on this panel will explore the ways in which librarians and non-librarians (artists, publishers, book sellers) collaborate to establish relationships that enrich collections and provide access to materials produced outside the mainstream publishing establishment. The panelists represent a diverse range of ideas and focus on different aspects of collection development. Each panelist will consider ways to navigate the challenges inherent to collecting and producing many types of non-traditional publications and resources from both sides of this exchange. They will also provide an overview of how they currently work with libraries, problems they’ve encountered that require solutions, and questions they have about the collection development process.

Friday May 2, 2014 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Pro amore liborum: Rare Book and Special Collections Librarianship
Sponsored by Michael R. Weintraub and Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Neal Turtell, Executive Librarian, National Gallery of Art
Mark Dimunation, Chief, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress
Vanessa Haight Smith, Head, Preservation Services, Smithsonian Libraries

Moderator:
Bill Baxter, President, Washington Rare Book Group / Head, History and Culture Department, Smithsonian Libraries

The greater Washington DC region is host to a wide range of world-class libraries, many of which hold specialized and rare book collections. Taking advantage of the area's wealth of collections, specialists, and enthusiasts, this panel will address fundamental issues in special collections and rare book librarianship, including conservation and preservation, acquisition, security, and handling and use.

Presenters will also address issues and arguments regarding whether rare book material should be part of the library's collection or the museum's. The panel will also investigate the book as object vs. the book as information. Presenters will also focus on collections and materials that can later be visited by attendees at the respective libraries that are easily accessible in downtown DC. The session is intended to both provide an introduction to rare book collection issues by experts in fields while showcasing local collections.

Friday May 2, 2014 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Latrobe Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Art Historians

Sponsored by Society Circle


Speakers:

Matthew Long, Project Coordinator, Ithaka S+R
Roger Schonfeld, Program Director for Libraries, Users, and Scholarly Practices, Ithaka S+R
Sandra Brooke, Librarian, Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University
Heather Gendron, Art Librarian, Sloane Art Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Moderator:

Roger C. Schonfield, Program Director for Libraries, Users, and Scholarly Practices Ithaka S+R

‪Ithaka S+R, a strategic consulting and research service that focuses on the transformation of scholarship in an online environment, has conducted an in-depth study of research practices in art history.

This project is part of Ithaka S+R’s larger Research Support Services Program. The goal of this program is to examine the evolving needs of researchers on a field-specific basis in order to best understand how libraries, visual resource centers, publishers, database providers, and other information services providers meet these needs. The project in art history is jointly funded by the Getty Foundation and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. Through interviews with faculty members, curators, museum professionals, graduate students, visual resource professionals, librarians, and others involved in the academic study of art history, Ithaka S+R has explored a wide variety of themes related to research practices. The project examines art historians’ work processes, their use of primary and secondary sources, their publication habits, and their adaptation to the digital environment. Special attention has been given to the impact of technology on research methodologies.

This session will provide an overview of the project findings and a discussion of their implications. The full findings will be published in early 2014 in a report that will be available on the Ithaka S+R website.

Recorded Session Available Summer 2014

Friday May 2, 2014 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Trade Catalogs: Opportunities and Challenges
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Trade Catalogs: Invaluable Resources - Mary Augusta Thomas, Deputy Director, Smithsonian Institution Libraries, and Stephen Van Dyk, Head, Art Libraries, Smithsonian Institution Libraries and Librarian, Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum
Through the Looking Glass: a Medium-specific Collection - Gail P. Bardhan, Reference and Research Librarian, Rakow Library, Corning Museum of Glass
From Stickley to Sears: Material Culture and Trade Catalogs - Emily Guthrie, NEH Librarian, Printed Book & Periodical Collection, Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
Trade Catalogs as Objects of Fine Printing and Design - Jared Ash, Special Collections Librarian, Thomas J. Watson Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Projects and Products: Building History in Architectural Trade Catalogs - Carolyn Yorke Yerkes, Curator of Avery Classics, Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University 

Moderator
Linda Seckelson, Principal Reader Services Librarian, Thomas J. Watson Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Politically, trade catalogs represent the industrial and commercial productivity and inventiveness of a nation – a measurement of its economic power in the post industrial world. They additionally promoted national styles that became adopted by countries as a form of identity and national pride. 

Trade catalogs are primary source materials for understanding the history and study of decorative arts and material culture. They are a specialized "genre" of art historical literature. Their care, acquisition, cataloging, organization and housing present particular challenges. There are large, recognized collections of them in some institutions, and smaller, scattered collections elsewhere. In some museum settings, they are considered "objects," and in other situations, they are in library collections. Their ambiguous status contributes to their complexity. Therefore, access to them is not always straightforward. 

The original purpose of trade catalogs was to illustrate and promote the use of manufactured products. Small mills and large corporations alike publish them as marketing tools for wholesalers, retailers and the public. Trade catalogs document existing products, new technologies, innovative design in products and packaging, and marketing methods. In addition, they chronicle diverse methods of printing and advertising layout. They are portable and accessible resources for disseminating new inventions and designs all over the world. They are important research tools for verifying manufacturers of objects, as visual resources for restorations and creation of facsimiles and as a means of understanding the style and taste of a place or time period. They document material culture in a way that links commerce, industry, design, taste and scholarship, and as such, are essential tools for the increasingly interdisciplinary study of art history, decorative arts and material culture. 

Each panelist will talk briefly about the collection at his/her institution and will emphasize important or unique contributions to study and research, as well as addressing any issues relating to cataloging, organization, digitization and collecting challenges for the future.

Friday May 2, 2014 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Burnham Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:15pm

Central Plains Chapter
Friday May 2, 2014 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:15pm

Midstates Chapter
Friday May 2, 2014 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Room: Roosevelt Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:15pm

Mountain West Chapter
Friday May 2, 2014 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:15pm

Northwest Chapter
Friday May 2, 2014 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Room: Washington Board Room Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:15pm

Texas/Mexico Chapter
Friday May 2, 2014 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Room: Wilson Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:45pm

Photographic Collections as Artifacts: Materiality, Digitization, and Access
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Objectifying the Archive: Preserving the Physicality of Photographic Collections for Enhanced Access - Shalimar Fojas White, Manager, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection
Enhancing access to photographic Collections at the GRI - Isotta Poggi, Assistant Curator, Getty Research Institute

Moderator: Emily Una Weirich, Access Services Supervisor/Student, Harvard Fine Arts Library/Simmons

Though online access and digitization are often the focus of discussions surrounding photographic archives and special collections, a great deal of information can still be gained from the original photographic items themselves. Many institutions provide access to their collections online, through online presentations and bibliographic records (among other things) to encourage remote use of these materials. These papers will present examples from two collections - the Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives at Dumbarton Oaks and the Photographs in the Special Collections at the Getty Research Institute - and discuss issues relating to access to the photographic materials held by these two institutions.

Friday May 2, 2014 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Room: Burnham Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:45pm

Politics, Power, and Preservation

Sponsored by Society Circle


Speakers:

The Tile Industry, Government Art, and The White House 'Restoration': The Brief Life of the White House Library's Fireplace Surround - Sally Stokes, Adjunct Lecturer, Cultural Heritage Information Management, School of Library and Information Science, The Catholic University of America and Interim Head, Art and Architecture Libraries, University of Maryland
Coinage, Politics, and Power: Preservation Grants and Fundraising at the Library of the American Numismatic Society - Elizabeth Hahn, Librarian, American Numismatic Society

Moderator:
Susan Reyburn, Senior Writer-editor, Publishing Office, Library of Congress

This session will address the complex connections between politics and cultural heritage preservation from two different perspectives.

Drawing from the fascinating story of the Franklin D. Roosevelt fireplace surround in the White House library, Sally Stokes of the Catholic University of America will discuss the role of government policy – or lack thereof – in the decoration, renovation, restoration, and documentation of government buildings. She will explain the challenges of conducting research on architectural elements within the White House when records are scant, scattered, and, in some cases, closed to researchers for security purposes. Stokes will also describe the efforts of a community of art librarians and historians to study the history of the ceramic tiles in the fireplace surround.

Presenter Elizabeth Hahn, head librarian for the American Numismatic Society, will describe her experience securing funding for preservation and access projects through private and government agencies. The example of coinage as propaganda will underline a continuing theme of the connection of art, and the institutions that preserve art, and politics, from the past to the present while also demonstrating how our actions often repeat the past. Hahn will also discuss the importance of exploring new ways for libraries and museums to attract donors to projects that may be perceived as unexciting, though necessary for the preservation and study of our cultural heritage.

Friday May 2, 2014 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Room: Latrobe Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:45pm

Preserving Canadian Cultural Heritage

Sponsored by Society Circle


Speakers:

Culture/History Wars in Canada: a Museum Library Perspective - Jonathan Franklin, Chief: Library, Archives and Research Fellowships Program, National Gallery of Canada
The Campaign to Save Canada's Documentary Heritage - Mary Kandiuk, Visual Arts Librarian,
Scott Library, York University

Moderator:
Jennifer Garland, Assistant Librarian, McGill University

What are the priorities for national collection building by government institutions in the face of dwindling resources? What strategies can be used by stakeholders to ensure that artistic, historical and cultural heritage is preserved? The national institution, Library and Archives Canada, has embarked on controversial directions and undergone abrupt changes of leadership. Stark reductions in funding have affected it and many smaller federal libraries as well. At the same time, Canadian history has loomed large in political discourse. A political campaign is being waged by librarians, archivists, academics, curators, artists, and a myriad of other citizens across the country in response to what is perceived as the dismantling of Canada’s documentary heritage.

Mary Kandiuk from York University will provide a chronology of the events leading up to the current crisis, a deconstruction of a political rhetoric that threatens the fabric of cultural institutions everywhere, and an overview of the collaborative efforts that are being used to influence government policy making. It will also highlight the successful multimedia strategies that are being used in a highly visible campaign resulting in hopeful signs that the tide may be turning.

Jonathan Franklin from the National Gallery of Canada will investigate whether there are particular lessons to be learned for art museum libraries as their role in general seems increasingly under threat. Is this an opportunity to be seized, or a trap to be avoided? Should the library ramp up its collecting and programming in related areas or maintain a steady course with no deviation?

Friday May 2, 2014 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:45pm

Social Media 'Think Tank'

Sponsored by Society Circle


Moderator:

Nedda Ahmed, Arts Librarian, Georgia State University

Modeled after the Social Media Sewing Circle that was held in Pasadena, this session will be a moderated "unconference" session devoted to social media. We'll cover some of the recent literature on social media in libraries (and beyond), then have ample time for open discussion about trends and ideas, sprinkled with attendees' show & tell.

Friday May 2, 2014 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:30pm

Collection Development SIG
Coordinator: Ross Day

Friday May 2, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:30pm

Materials SIG
Coordinator: Mark Pompelia

Friday May 2, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:30pm

Provenance SIG
Coordinator: Philip Dombowsky

Friday May 2, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: Washington Board Room Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:45pm

SEI Reunion
Reunite with your SEI colleagues and raise a toast to this joint project of ARLIS/NA and VRAF as it embarks on its 11th year! Previous attendees of the Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management as well as instructors, co-chairs, implementation team members, and sponsors are welcome to attend. If you are thinking about registering for a future SEI or hosting SEI at your institution someday, this event is also for you! Join us at the Cure Bar & Bistro in the Grand Hyatt Washington.

Friday May 2, 2014 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Cure Bar & Bistro, Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:45pm

First Time Attendees Reception
Sponsored by Aux Amateurs de Livres International 

Hosted by Gregg Most, ARLIS/NA President. Come mix and mingle with members of the ARLIS/NA Executive Board, as well as other society leaders. Open to all first-time conference attendees. We look forward to meeting you!



Friday May 2, 2014 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Room: Wilson/Roosevelt Rooms Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

6:00pm

Reception at Dumbarton Oaks
**REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS FULL** 

Sponsored by Dumbarton Oaks and Ars Libri, Ltd.


Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection is an institute of Harvard University, dedicated to Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-columbian studies located in Washington’s historic Georgetown neighborhood. The Reception at Dumbarton Oaks offers an unprecedented chance for us to enjoy the spring gardens at twilight, visit the Research Library, Rare Book Collection, and the Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives. The museum galleries will be open exclusively for attendees, and the gift shop will offer a conference attendee discount for your shopping pleasure.

The event is open to the first 300 conference attendees who register for the reception. Only registered conference attendees may attend the Reception. No guests will be permitted. Gardens will close at 8:30 pm.
This event is free.

Note: Large bags and satchels are not permitted on the Dumbarton Oaks grounds.

Transportation:
Bus transportation ($10) is provided for preregistered attendees. For other transportation options, please see the Registration & Hospitality Desk.


Friday May 2, 2014 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection 1703 32nd Street, NW, Washington DC 20007

8:30pm

ArLiSNAP Night Out

The ArLiSNAP Night Out is an informal networking event at a local bar for students and young professionals. Drop in for a few minutes or stay all night!

This year’s gathering will take place at Capitol City Brewing Company, conveniently located one block west of the conference hotel. Meet in the hotel lobby at 8:15pm or join us at the pub.


Friday May 2, 2014 8:30pm - 10:30pm
Capitol City Brewing Company 1100 New York Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20005

9:00pm

Exhibits Set-up
Friday May 2, 2014 9:00pm - 11:00pm
Room: Independence Ballroom A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001
 
Saturday, May 3
 

6:00am

Exhibits Set-up
Saturday May 3, 2014 6:00am - 9:00am
Room: Independence Ballroom A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

7:00am

Yoga
Wake up with your ARLIS/NA colleagues and enjoy an energizing yoga practice lead by Deborah Ultan Boudewyns. A great way to start off a busy day of conferencing!

Saturday May 3, 2014 7:00am - 8:00am
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

7:00am

Registration & Hospitality Desk Open
Saturday May 3, 2014 7:00am - 6:30pm
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Systems Meet-up

Organizer: Lily Pregill, NYARC Coordinator & Systems Manager

This is an open forum to discuss ILSs, emerging library service platforms, discovery layers, other systems (Drupal, Omeka, ContentDM, etc.), integration, challenges, successes, etc. 


Saturday May 3, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Leadership Breakfast
Sponsored by F.A. Bernett Books.

This event is invitation only.



Saturday May 3, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Room: Penn Quarter A/B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

To Market, To Market -- Local Art, Crafts & Breakfast: Eastern Market Walking Tour
Built in 1873 and located on Capitol Hill, Eastern Market is DC’s original and premier food & arts Market. Throughout the week, vendors inside the Market sell the freshest meats, produce, cheeses and pastries. Each weekend, hundreds of DC’s best local artists and crafters set up tents in the street and plazas surrounding Eastern market to sell paintings, sculpture, pottery, photographs, flowers, pastries, handmade crafts, jewelry, and baubles of every description. In addition, there is a Flea Market every weekend just across the street!

Breakfast on the weekend at Market Lunch at Eastern Market is a Capitol Hill tradition – be prepared to wait in line and bring cash! Completed in 1873 and refurbished in 2009, the market was designed by Adolph Cluss, a prominent local architect responsible for many post-Civil War buildings in the District of Columbia. Typical of the commercial architecture of the period, Eastern Market is one of the few public markets left in Washington, DC, and the only one retaining its original public market function.

A tour shepherd will accompany the group to Eastern market by Metro, point out some highlights, and will turn you loose in what feels like a festival! You can wander the Market and have breakfast on your own.

When you are ready simply take the Metro (one block away from Eastern market) back to the Grand Hyatt Hotel. A map will be provided. 

Maximum Participants: 50

Fee:
Free, with the exception of transportation costs.

Transportation:
The group will take Metro to the Eastern Market stop and will leave at 8:00am. Fare is $1.70 each way with a SmarTrip card, or $2.70 each way with a paper farecard. Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby 15 minutes prior to departure.


Saturday May 3, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Eastern Market 225 7th St SE, Washington, DC 20003

8:00am

Self-Schedule Room

Reservation on-site only

To reserve Self-Schedule Room, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Saturday May 3, 2014 8:00am - 3:00pm
Room: Independence Ballroom F 1000 H St NW, Washington DC 20001

9:00am

Digital Humanities SIG
Coordinator: Sarah Falls, Head, Fine Arts Library, Ohio State University

Saturday May 3, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:00am

Exhibit Hall Opening Reception
Sponsored by Erasmus Boekhandel and The MediaPreserve.

Saturday May 3, 2014 9:00am - 10:30am
Independence Foyer Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:00am

Self-Schedule Room

Reservation on-site only

To reserve Self-Schedule Room, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Saturday May 3, 2014 9:00am - 11:30am
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:00am

Exhibits Open
Saturday May 3, 2014 9:00am - 1:30pm
Room: Independence Ballroom A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

10:00am

Archaeology & Classics SIG
Coordinator: Amy Ciccone

Saturday May 3, 2014 10:00am - 11:00am
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

10:30am

A Culture of Collaboration: The FAB Initiative 5th Annual Update
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Collaborative Collection Development for the Getty Research Portal- Kathleen Salomon, Assistant Director, and Alyx Rossetti, Metadata Librarian, Getty Research Institute
New Direction in Web Archiving and Collaborative Partnerships- Carole Ann Fabian, Director, Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University
WorldCat Art Discovery Group Catalog: an International Network- Geert-Jan Koot, Director of the Research Library, Rijksmuseum
Working Together: Decision Support for Developing Digital Collections- Carole Ann Fabian, Director, Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University

Moderators:
Kathleen Salomon, Assistant Director, Getty Research Institute
Carole Ann Fabian, Director, Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University

Over the past five years, the Future of Art Bibliography (FAB) Initiative has served as a vehicle to develop collaborative efforts that aim--via discipline-specific open-access projects--to facilitate 21st century art historical research. The ensuing complementary and collaborative initiatives have been moving toward a shared ideal of making art historical literature in its many formats accessible to scholars worldwide, facilitating research, and furthermore encouraging a new kind of scholarly engagement with the materials.

The politics and diplomacy necessary to engage collaborators and scale such projects will be this year’s focus. Common to all of these projects is an urgent need to productively engage institutions both locally and internationally in a dialogue about the focus of current projects that will foster more collaboration and cooperation. Following this thread, the session will conclude by providing time for presentation and discussion of a proposal for a collective tool for “decision-support” that will assist in identifying both overlapping digital projects and lacunae in order to encourage the development of collaborative as well as unique projects that will further FAB’s overarching goal for the field.

Saturday May 3, 2014 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room: Conference Theater Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

10:30am

Designing an Information Literacy MOOC for Art Students
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Tony White, Director, Decker Library, Maryland Institute College of Art
Sue Maberry, Director of the Library and Instructional Technology, Otis College of Art and Design
Jennifer Friedman, Instruction and Research Services Librarian, Ringling College of Art and Design
David Pemberton, Reference and Periodicals Librarian, School of the Visual Arts
Carrie Saarinen, Senior Instructional Designer for Canvas Network, Instructure, Inc.

Moderator:
Diana Harter, Humanities Department Assistant, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University

Under the theme of "Power and Agency" this session will focus on Inter-Institutional collaboration. We don’t all have to reinvent the wheel. This session will focus on a case study of an inter-institutional collaboration among the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD) to create an information literacy MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) for students in art and design. 

The idea for a MOOC was suggested at the AICAD Library Director’s meeting in Pasadena. The initial goal was to provide a MOOC for AICAD students in their first year of study, but also open for anyone to enroll in. Lessons learned from our efforts may have broader impact and importance for other libraries and institutions, and consortia, and may provide a new model for collaboration with regard to library instruction. The MOOC provider Canvas.net expressed interest in the concept and requested a syllabus and course draft by August 2013.  The course was broken down into asynchronous modules, and included interactive learning objects, videos, assignments, quizzes, handouts, and an assessment instrument.  Modules included: Why is research important; search terms and concept mapping; beyond Google (i.e., databases); All Information Is NOT Created Equal; and Copyright and How to Avoid Plagiarism.  In this session AICAD directors and Librarians will report on how successful (or not) the MOOC was, recommend improvements, next steps, as well as the discussion of the process of collaboration.

Saturday May 3, 2014 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

10:30am

The Politics of Change: Digital Humanities
Sponsored by Statewide California Electronic Library Consortium (SCELC)

Speakers:

Mapping Cultural Exchange: Strategies for Locating the Narrative in the Digital World - Dr. Michele Greet, Dept. of History and Art History, George Mason University
Partnering for Agency: Empowering Users in the Creative Teaching and Research Process - Kristina Keogh, Head, Fine Arts Library, Indiana University at Bloomington
Hidden from Sight: Exposing Local World War I Collections for a Centennial Exhibition - Kathleen Lonbom, Art, Theater and Dance Librarian, and Angela Bonnell, Head of Liaison and Reference Services, Milner Library, Illinois Sate University

Moderator:
Sarah Falls, Head, Fine Arts Library, Ohio State University

Digital Humanities interprets the cultural and social impact of new media and information technologies—the fundamental components of the new information age—as well as creates and applies these technologies to answer cultural, social, historical, and philological questions, both those traditionally conceived and those only enabled by new technologies.” (UCLA Center for Digital Humanities). Digital Humanities (DH) includes such activities as curating online collections, mining large cultural data sets, data visualization, information retrieval, digital publishing, gaming, multimedia, peer-to-peer collaboration, and GIS and mapping. Visual arts DH projects draw on one or many of these components, as well as incorporating content and methodologies from related humanities, or science and social science, disciplines. In this new collaborative, interdisciplinary digital environment, librarians and visual resources specialists work side-by-side with faculty and students to develop and support DH projects for teaching and research.

This session seeks to highlight the issues and politics of change surrounding the support, development, dissemination, and preservation of DH projects in the arts and humanities. Panelists will address the issues surrounding the transformational changes brought about by introducing the concepts of Digital Humanities into the arts disciplines -- empowering new modes of research in the visual arts, intra-institutional collaboration, preservation and access (new technologies, organizational models, collaborative projects), copyright, and scholarly publishing.

Recorded Session Available Summer 2014

Saturday May 3, 2014 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

10:30am

Visual Literacy: Putting Guidelines into Practice
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Jennifer Friedman, Instruction and Research Services Librarian, Ringling College of Art & Design
Sarah Carter, Assistant Professor and Director of Bridwell Art Library, University of Louisville
Carrie McDade, Head Librarian, Lesley University College of Art & Design
Gary Ginther, Fine Arts Librarian, Ohio University
Robin Potter, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Santa Fe Community College

Moderator:
Greg Hatch, Head of Fine Arts and Architecture, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah

In October 2011, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) published its Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. The 10-page document identifies seven standards (modeled on ACRL’s own Information Literacy Competency Standards) and prescribes performance indicators and learning outcomes for students in higher education. However, the guidelines did not include librarian users in its scope nor did it offer practical examples of how to apply the standards in real-world situations.

During the first half of this panel session, the speakers will present a wide variety of visual literary projects and initiatives, which will inspire attendees—from academic, art school, and museum libraries alike—with real-world examples of how ACRL's visual literacy guidelines have been implemented. The speakers will note which ACRL Visual Literacy Standards correlate to their examples, as well as comment on the financial costs, time investment, and the technology and skills required to implement them. The second half of this session will engage attendees with interactive discussions on developing and embedding visual literacy into their own library work.

Saturday May 3, 2014 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

12:00pm

Finance Committee
Chair: Tom Riedel

Saturday May 3, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room: Washington Board Room Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

12:00pm

Ivies+ Art and Architecture Group
Coordinator: William Keller

Saturday May 3, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room: Independence Ballroom I Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

12:00pm

Southeast Chapter
Saturday May 3, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room: Independence Ballroom G 1000 H St NW, Washington DC 20001

12:00pm

Southern California Chapter
Saturday May 3, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

12:00pm

Artstor User Group Lunch
Open to all; capacity limited to 200 attendees; first come, first serve.

Saturday May 3, 2014 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Room: Constitution Ballroom A

1:00pm

Creative Engagement for Advocacy: Innovative Partnerships between Artists and Librarians
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

The Ar(t)chive: The Intersection of Artists and Archives through Collaboration - Marcie Farwell, Collections Assistant, Cornell University, and Jessica Rozler, Independent Researcher
Visiting Artist Lecture Series: An Academic Library, Civic, and Community Partnership to Advocate and Educate about the Arts- John Burns, Reference Librarian, Dixie State University
The People's Library: Libraries Designed, Built, and Authored by Community Members - Mark Strandquist and Courtney Bowles, Co-directors, The People's Library

Moderator:
John Burns, Reference Librarian, Dixie State University

While artists have used archival and bibliographic materials as inspiration for years, today a growing number of libraries and archives are fostering relationships with artists via artist-in-residency programs, classes, workshops, and exhibitions. This session will discuss three distinctive ways to encourage collaborations between libraries and archives and their constituencies.

Saturday May 3, 2014 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Room: Bulfinch/Renwick Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:00pm

Picturing Dissent: Documentation of Labor Movements' Actions from the Late 19th Century to the Present
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Art and Recreation: The International Garment Workers' Union, Unity House, and Diego Rivera
- Kathryn Dowgiewicz, ILGWU Project Archivist, Kheel Center, Cornell University

Shooting Back: Labor Portrays Itself and the World (in the collections of the Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives) - Erika Gottfried, Curator of Nonprint Collections, Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives/Abraham Lincoln Brigade Archives, New York University

Black and White and Red All Over: Bernard Kassoy’s McCarthy Era Political Cartoons in the New York Teacher News - Barb Morley, Digital Archivist, Kheel Center, Cornell University

Opportunities and Challenges: Collecting and Managing Activists' Photos Available on the Web - Anna Perricci, Web Archiving Project Librarian, Columbia University

Moderator:
Elizabeth Berenz, Senior Implementation Manager, Artstor

Art and politics collide in the documentation of the history of the labor movement. Several speakers from Cornell University and New York University will present their special collections of documentary photographs, political cartoons, and labor movement ephemera across a century. An additional speaker from Columbia University who is also a member of the Occupy Wall Street Archives Working Group will present about the work of that group, including how Bulkr and the use of Creative Commons licensing helped the working group with the challenges they faced collecting material outside of an institutional setting.

Recorded Session Available Summer 2014

Saturday May 3, 2014 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:00pm

Reinventing the Scholarly Collection Catalogue for the Online Age

Sponsored by Society Circle


Speakers:

Jennifer Henel, Curatorial Associate, Department of Northern Baroque Paintings, National Gallery of Art
Nancy Thomas, Senior Deputy Director, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Michele Miller, Registrar and Museum Database Specialist, Seattle Art Museum
Nancy Micklewright, Head of Scholarly Programs and Publications, Freer and Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian Institution

Moderator:
Anne Helmreich, Senior Program Officer, Getty Foundation

Publishing scholarly collection catalogues is a critical part of a museum's mission. Based on meticulous research, these catalogues make available detailed information about the individual works in a museum's collection, ensuring the contents a place in art history. Yet printed volumes are costly to produce and difficult to update regularly; their potential content often exceeds allotted space. One could say they are like thoroughbred horses confined to stock pens. Digital publishing presents an alternative, and the Getty Foundation's Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative (OSCI) is helping museums make the transition from printed volumes to multimedia, web-based publications freely available to anyone with a computer, tablet, or smartphone.

The Foundation launched OSCI in 2009 in partnership with the J. Paul Getty Museum and eight other institutions: the Art Institute of Chicago; the Arthur M. Sackler and Freer Gallery of Art; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C.; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Seattle Art Museum; Tate; and the Walker Art Center. The consortium's goals are to create models for online catalogues that will dramatically increase access to museum collections; make available new, interdisciplinary, up-to-date research; and revolutionize how this research is conducted, presented, and utilized. The panelists will discuss the different approaches taken by their respective institutions to implement this innovative concept.

Saturday May 3, 2014 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Room: Conference Theater Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:00pm

Retooling Art Reference and Information Services: Collaborative Tools, Strategies, and Models
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Sara Snyder, Information Technology Specialist, Archives of American Art
Elizabeth Botten, Archives Specialist, Archives of American Art
Kraig Binkowski Chief Librarian, Yale Center for British Art
Elizabeth Morris Assistant Librarian, Yale Center for British Art
Fran Scott, Director of Library Services, Georgian Court University

Moderator:
Emilee Mathews, Research Librarian for Visual Arts, University of California Irvine

In the perennial struggle to improve library collections, policies, and services with rapidly changing user needs, the reference transaction is a powerful encounter that can be mined for data to improve, streamline, and innovate existing practices. The papers below demonstrate ways that each speaker has capitalized on this interaction to make a positive impact on their institution’s relationship with its constituency.

Elizabeth Botten and Sara Snyder of the Archives of American Art have created an innovative program to improve their institution's digital collections interface. By retooling real-life reference questions into tasks for web-usability testing, they have devised a practical, low-budget methodology that informs the Archives’ design and information architecture. This strategy has forged a close collaboration between reference, processing archivists and information technology, and has bolstered the belief that supporting researchers is everyone’s job.

The Yale Center for British Art’s Kraig Binkowski and Elizabeth Morris have created an innovative and powerful reference tool with the creation of comprehensive, object-focused bibliographies for their museum’s permanent collections. Culled from contemporary literature and historical documents and created with the collaboration of several museum departments, these tools enhances the on-site and online research experience for both the general public and scholars.

Fran Scott, formerly Manager of the Architecture Library and Reference and Instruction Services at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute discusses the successes and challenges of the implementation of a new reference model. Created to be on-call as well as offer tiered service, the objective of this new model was to free up desk time for new projects and the required collaboration of staff and librarians outside of the reference and instruction services department.

Together, these papers provide guidance and inspiration to think critically about leveraging and promoting user empowerment in the art library across a broad spectrum of museum, academic, and art and design school libraries serving a wide variety of users and needs.

Saturday May 3, 2014 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:00pm

Self-Schedule Room

Reservation on-site only

To reserve Self-Schedule Room, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Saturday May 3, 2014 1:00pm - 6:00pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:30pm

Exhibits Closed (lunch break)
Saturday May 3, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room: Independence Ballroom A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:30pm

Awards Committee
Chair: Rebecca Cooper

Saturday May 3, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:30pm

Cataloging Advisory Committee
Chair: Maria Oldal

Saturday May 3, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room: Penn Quarter A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:30pm

Membership Committee
Chair: Kimberly Detterbeck

Saturday May 3, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:30pm

Public Policy Committee
Co-Chairs: Carmen Orth-Alfie, Patrick Tomlin

Saturday May 3, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room: Washington Board Room Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:30pm

Gerd Muehsam Award Committee
Saturday May 3, 2014 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

2:30pm

Cataloging Problems Discussion Group

The Cataloging Problems Discussion Group, a venerable ARLIS conference tradition, is an informal discussion of cataloging issues such as the RDA cataloging rules, tagging, NACO, SACO, BIBCO, MARC, and BIBFRAME. Attendees are encouraged to ask questions because "there is no such thing as a dumb question."


Saturday May 3, 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:30pm

Exhibit Hall Reception
Sponsored by Oxford University Press.

Saturday May 3, 2014 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Room: Independence Ballroom A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:30pm

Emerging Technology Forum
Sponsored by Smithsonian Libraries

Moderator: 
Elizabeth Lane, Associate Librarian for Public Services, Frick Art Reference Library, The Frick Collection

(2:45 start time)
Using Lucidchart as an Interactive Educational Tool
- Allana Mayer, Student, McGill University

Power Searching Images with Google Image Upload and the Jelly - Kim Collins, Art History Librarian, Emory University

Using Tumblr to Promote "Documenting Modern Living: Digitizing the Miller House and Garden Collection" - Amy Auscherman, Archives Assistant, Indianapolis Museum of Art
 
Enhancing Information Literacy Classes with XBox and Kinect Videos - Nicole Beatty, Arts and Humanities Librarian, Stewart Library, Weber State University

(3:30 start time)
Artsy and the Art Genome Project
-Christine Kuan, Chief Curator & Director of Strategic Partnerships; Matthew Israel, Director of the Art Genome Project; Jessica Backus, Research Manager, Artsy

Adapting Old to New: Digital Catalogues Raisonné in the Library - Caitlin Harrington, Researcher, Artifex Press

The Emerging Technology Forum will showcase ways in which information professionals are using new, free, and/or open-source technologies to make their jobs more efficient, their teaching more effective, or their collections more accessible. 

Stop by to hear short lighting round presentations and visit technology stations for hands-on demonstrations.

Saturday May 3, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:30pm

Poster Session
Take advantage of a 2-hour Poster Session to learn from and interact with presenters covering an array of topics relevant to art librarianship.

TITLES & PRESENTERS

Pins, Smores, and Doodles: 15 Creative Ways to use 5 Social Sharing Tools - Lauren Puzier, Reference and Cataloging Librarian, Sotheby's Institute of Art, and Abigail Stambach, College Archivist and Coordinator of Reference Services, The Sage Colleges

Art a la Cart - Stephanie Frontz, Art Librarian and Head, Art/Music Library, University of Rochester

Why Documenting Political Street Art is Important to the Historical Record - Carmen Cowick, Graduate Student, CUNY Queens College

Art Unbound: A Cross-Departmental Collaboration to Develop Policies and Procedures for the Self-Submission of Born-Digital MFA Art Theses in the Carolina Digital Repository - Heather Gendron, Head of the Sloane Art Library, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Everyone's a Winner When We Offer Good Customer Service! Motivating Student Employees with Games - Amy Trendler, Architecture Librarian, Ball State University

Reflecting on Craft Horizons: Managing and Marketing a Magazine Digitization Project - Jessica Shaykett, Librarian, American Craft Council

E-reader Clinics for Faculty and Staff - Tina Chan, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Andrea Ross, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Emily Thompson, Learning Technologies Librarian, State University of New York at Oswego

Graphics Atlas: A Photograph and Print Identification Resource for Libraries, Archives, Museums, Educators, Conservators and the General Public - Sona Pastel-Daneshgar, Graduate Student and Photographic Research Intern, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Image Permanence Institute

Teaching with Artists' Books: An Interdisciplinary Approach for the Liberal Arts - Louise Kulp, Visual Resources Librarian and Curator of Artists' Books Collection, Franklin & Marshall College

#findthosepagodas: lessons learned - Adeane Bregman, Head, Bapst Library, Boston College

Leveraging the Semantic Web: An Exploration of Linked Data - Dan Moore, Recent Graduate, Independent

Digitizing Ephemera: A Case Study for Research, Strategy, and Implementation of a Digitization Plan for the National Gallery of Art Library’s Vertical Files - Kai Alexis Smith, Adjunct Reference Librarian, CUNY Graduate Center

Slipping the Bonds of Earthly Metadata Schemas: Cataloging the Regis University Santo Collection - Tom Riedel, Distance Services Librarian & Curator, Santo Collection, and Alison Verplaetse, Digital Collections Librarian, Regis University

Gender and Sexuality in the Fine Arts: A Bibliography in Progress - Anna-Sophia Zingarelli-Sweet, MLIS Candidate, University of Pittsburgh School of Information Sciences

Mapping the Boston Built Environment: History Pin in the Classroom - Christine Cavalier, Visual Resources Manager, and Victoria Solan, Visiting Lecturer, Tufts University

Art Library as Alternative Gallery - Tiffany Saulter, Graduate Student, Indiana University, Department of Library Science

Fostering Collaboration: The Minnesota Digital Library and the Digital Public Library of America [One Year Out] - Greta Bahnemann, Metadata Coordinator, Minnesota Digital Library, University of Minnesota

The Librarian as Parent and Caregiver: An Exploration - Rebecca K. Friedman, Assistant Librarian, Marquand Library of Art, Princeton University

Seen Obscene: Sexually Explicit Materials in the Library - Jaye Fishel, Library Work Study, The Banff Centre

Visual Browsing: Graphic Interpretation of Library of Congress Classification - Greg Hatch, Head of Fine Arts and Architecture, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah

Yours, Mine and Ours: Coordinating Collection Development and Access in the Ivies+ Art and Architecture Libraries - Amanda Bowen, Head of Collections, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University; Sandra Brooke, Librarian, Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University; Martha Walker, Architecture Librarian and Coordinator of Collections, Fine Arts Library, Cornell University

Transformative Material Investigations: Partnering with Students and Faculty to Design a Library Exhibition Space - Kasia Leousis, Architecture and Art Librarian, and Robert Spruill, Assistant Professor of Architecture, Auburn University

Tactile Texts: Transforming Artist Books to the Online Environment - Jenna Rinalducci, Art & Visual Technology Liaison Librarian, George Mason University, Tricia Mackenzie, Cataloging & Metadata Librarian, George Mason University, Jen Stevens, Humanities Liaison Librarian, George Mason University

Staying Alive! - Nicole Lovenjak, Graduate Student, Faculty of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario and Daniel Payne, Head, Instructional Services, OCAD University

Introduction to the New Database of Répertoire International d'Iconographie Musicale (RIdIM) - Jarod Ogier, Associate Editor, Répertoire International d'Iconographie Musicale (RIdIM), Ohio State University

The Rights and Reproductions Handbook for Cultural Institutions - Anne M. Young, Manager of Rights and Reproductions, Indianapolis Museum of Art

Surprise! Pop-Up Libraries Where You Least Expect Them - Jennifer Friedman, Instruction + Research Services Librarian, Ringling College of Art + Design and Sarah Carter, Director of the Bridwell Art Library, University of Louisville

Alt-Text Accommodations for the Art Student - Gabrielle Reed, Head of Access Services, Massachusetts College of Art & Design

Fork Ahead: Roadmap of the Migration Adventure at Vanderbilt University - Chris Strasbaugh, Director of Visual Resources, Vanderbilt University

Empowering Research with LibGuides: QR Code Bookmarks for Class Pages and Subject Guides
– Rebecca Barham, Art Reference Librarian, University of North Texas

Saturday May 3, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Independence Foyer Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:30pm

Exhibits Open
Saturday May 3, 2014 2:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: Independence Ballroom A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:00pm

Canada Chapter
Coordinator: Daniel Payne

Saturday May 3, 2014 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room: Washington Board Room Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:00pm

Development Committee
Chair: Ann Roll

Saturday May 3, 2014 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:00pm

Graphic Novels SIG
Coordinator: Tara Spies Smith

Saturday May 3, 2014 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room: Bulfinch/Renwick Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:00pm

Nominating Committee
Chair: Kim Collins

Saturday May 3, 2014 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:00pm

Professional Development Committee
Chair: Maggie Portis

Saturday May 3, 2014 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room: Penn Quarter A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:00pm

Communications and Publications Committee
Chair: Amy Lucker

Saturday May 3, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room: Penn Quarter A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:00pm

Diversity Committee
Chair: Patrick Tomlin

Saturday May 3, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room: Washington Board Room Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:00pm

International Relations Committee
Saturday May 3, 2014 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:15pm

LGBTQ SIG
Coordinators: Debra Cantrell-Evans, Edward Lukasek

Saturday May 3, 2014 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:30pm

All Power to the People: Collecting and Preserving Art of Social Movements

Sponsored by Society Circle


Speakers:

Digital Activism: Manifestos and Protest Ephemera in the Library- Hannah Bennett, Librarian, Princeton University School of Architecture

Telling the Story of the Lions: A Collaborative, Community-Based Approach to Documenting and Preserving Political Graphics Collections- Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez, Project Archivist, Center for the Study of Political Graphics (CSPG) and Bolton Doub, Project Archivist, Center for the Study of Political Graphics (CSPG)

Moderator:
Greta Suiter, Processing Specialist, George Mason University Libraries

Preserving and collection social movements presents myriad challenges for archivists and information professionals. This session pairs a fervent call to action with an exemplary case study.

Hannah Bennett of Princeton University will challenge art and architecture libraries to identify, collect, catalog and preserve the manifestos and ephemeral productions created by today's Design Activists. Tracking and preserving such material is especially difficult since it appears in the fugitive forms of email, microblogs, Wikileaks, social media sites, and so on. Simply recognizing activist productions can be problematic in the digital age, let alone collecting, cataloging and preserving them. They can appear--and disappear--instantaneously; they emerge at points along a network rather than on discrete sheets of paper. This paper will address the vital struggle to curate creative audacity in all its forms for the use of generations to come.

A second paper by Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez and Bolton Doub from the Center for the Study of Political Graphics (CSPG) will show how a grassroots archive independent of a parent institution, was able to successfully establish long-term relationships with the communities it documents, while providing access to archival collections through grants, public programming, and collaborative projects. The paper will detail examples of CSPG’s community-based and inter-institutional collaborative projects, with a particular focus on a current two-year National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) grant-funded project to arrange, describe, process, catalog, and partially digitize its entire holdings.

Saturday May 3, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:30pm

Hidden in Plain Sight: Facilitating Discovery in Material Culture Resource Collections
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Provenance, Pedigree, and Poverty: Challenging Museumologists Discourse on Navajo Textile History- Kathy M'Closkey, Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Windsor (presented by Kathy Edwards)
Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD University Library: Diffusing the Discourses of Power- Daniel Payne, Head Instructional Services, Dorothy H. Hoover Library, OCAD University

Moderator:
Kathy Edwards, Research & Collection Development Librarian, Gunnin Architecture Library, Clemson University

This session will discuss ways in which libraries can facilitate discovery of unknown primary and secondary resources relevant to research in indigenous material culture collections.

In 1996, the Heard Museum (Phoenix, AZ), sponsored the symposium and exhibition “Inventing the Southwest: The Fred Harvey Company and Native American Art.” Founded in 1876, the Company managed the restaurants and dining cars for the Santa Fe Railroad. A publication featuring essays from twenty contributors accompanied the show. Although sixty percent of the papers dealt with important stakeholders involved with marketing Native American collectibles, none of the authors accessed information from the Company’s Indian Department ledger books containing thousands of entries related to the purchase and disposition of Native American creations acquired after 1900. Yet these primary documents were housed directly above the symposium’s location--in the Museum’s library.

Can post-colonial voices be heard within an institutional forum founded in a colonial past? Michel Foucault’s Archaeology of Knowledge (L'archéologie du savoir, 1969) offers an indictment of hegemonic environments constructed by institutions that use codified discursive practices to arbitrarily impose a hierarchical order onto the world of knowledge based on values, norms and assumptions unique to their own cultural vantage point. For libraries using subject classification schemes such as Library of Congress system, criticisms of this nature seem deeply provoking. Concerns of this nature became prescient at OCAD University with the introduction of the Indigenous Visual Culture (INVC) program, a degree stream that offers either major or minor courses of study. Founded by the university’s School of Interdisciplinary Studies, the INVC curriculum encompasses courses from all three OCAD U faculties of Art, Design and Liberal Arts & Sciences. In addition to new course offerings, each faculty has revised selected pre-existing courses to include components of aboriginal ways of understanding and knowing, leading to a meaningful integration of course objectives where indigenous perspectives permeate all aspects of the university’s curriculum.

Saturday May 3, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: Bulfinch/Renwick Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:30pm

Preserving Civic Heritage
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Partners in Preservation: Documenting the Nation's Oldest City- Tom Caswell, University Librarian, University of Florida
Documenting a City's Past, Present, and Future: or, How a University Library Can Work with Local Civic Entities to Preserve and Protect the Built and Planned Environment- Viveca Pattison Robichaud, Visiting Librarian, University of Notre Dame, and Jennifer Parker, Associate Librarian, University of Notre Dame

Moderator:
Courtney Baron, MLIS Student, Valdosta State University

Tom Caswell will present about "Unearthing St. Augustine’s Colonial Heritage," a federally funded collaborative project which draws together four different repositories of hidden and fragile archival material which have been previously inaccessible to researchers worldwide and is now freely available in an open source database. By partnering both public and private institutions, this initiative digitally preserves and provides access to thousands of maps, drawings, photographs and documents which help in telling St. Augustine’s unique “story” as the United States’ oldest city on a global scale. Among the important archival items to be “unearthed,” which date from the 16th century to the present, include maps and overlays of the city, architectural drawings of historic structures, Spanish and British colonial government documents, as well as records, photographs, and site summaries from key archaeological excavations.

Viveca Pattison Robichaud and Jennifer Parker will speak about a project to create an online resource to study past, present and future architecture in the city of South Bend, produced by the Hesburgh Libraries of Notre Dame’s Architecture Library and South Bend’s Center for History and the Historic Preservation Commission of South Bend and St. Joseph’s County. This resource is intended to provide access to historic architecture that has been demolished, historic architecture and historic districts that currently exist which we have documentation and/or blueprints of, and student proposals for the revitalization of undeveloped urban districts and locations within the city. This project includes creating a preservation plan for the blueprints, maps, and photographs, a digitization plan, and a catalog of the historic blueprint collection.

Saturday May 3, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:30pm

Professional Trajectories: Career Paths and Leadership Training

Sponsored by Society Circle


Speakers:

Ask Not What Your Profession Can Do For You: Surveying Art Librarian Career Paths and Attitude- Eamon Tewell, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Long Island University, Brooklyn
The Problem with Leadership Training for Librarians- Rachel Resnick, Librarian, Massachusetts College of Art and Design

Moderator:
Alison Huftalen, Head Librarian, Toledo Museum of Art

As many can attest, the path one takes to art librarianship is not always a direct route with clear goals and strategies. Additionally, once in the profession, support for development in leadership skills is often lacking. Eamon Tewell from Long Island University, Brooklyn, will present the results of an international survey of art librarians' motivations for selecting the field, as well as their educational backgrounds, previous and current employment, and advice for graduate students and prospective librarians seeking to enter the profession. The survey results, accompanied by illustrative quotes from respondents and charts to visualize the data, will be reviewed and critically evaluated.

Attendees will learn more about the demographics and career paths in the profession as voiced by respondents in two dozen countries, and be able to identify core values of art librarianship expressed of, by, and for the profession. Rachel Resnik from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design will examine the scarce opportunities for art librarians to hone their leadership skills. Librarians need to be savvy negotiators, excellent bridge builders, and creative agents of change.   

For the sake of their careers and the Society, ARLIS/NA members need to become power brokers within their institutions. The presentation will investigate why a profession that is traditionally so effective and proactive in training, is failing to satisfactorily provide training opportunities in regards to leadership.

Saturday May 3, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: Conference Theater Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

6:00pm

Convocation and Reception
Reception sponsored by Proquest and Library of Congress. 
Speaker, Susan Stamberg, sponsored by the National Museum of Women in the Arts.


The 1897 Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress will be the site of the 2014 Convocation and Reception for ARLIS/NA attendees. The distinguished NPR correspondent Susan Stamberg will be our Convocation speaker; the theme of her talk is “Art Will Save the World.” Following the Convocation, attendees can mingle with cocktails and appetizers in the stunningly beautiful Great Hall, and will be able to see Thomas Jefferson’s book collection and the current exhibition Exploring the Early Americas. The Main Reading Room will be open so that all may visit this magnificent working room. Main Reading room staff will be on hand to discuss the workings, architecture, and grandeur of this majestic space.

Transportation: Transportation is by Metro's Blue or Orange lines from Metro Center station to South Capitol station. The Jefferson Building is one block north from the station.




Saturday May 3, 2014 6:00pm - 10:00pm
The Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First Street, SE, Washington, DC 20540
 
Sunday, May 4
 

7:00am

Registration & Hospitality Desk Open
Sunday May 4, 2014 7:00am - 6:30pm
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Architecture Section
Moderator: Jesse Vestermark

Sunday May 4, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

ArLiSNAP

Moderator: Stephanie Grimm

Join ArLiSNAP to discuss issues of relevance to art library students and new professionals, including all of the latest developments and ongoing projects from the group and our members.


Sunday May 4, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Room: Penn Quarter A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Cataloging Section
Moderator: Tamara Fultz

Sunday May 4, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Harvard Librarians
Coordinator: Shalimar Fojas White

By invitation only.

Sunday May 4, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Room: Washington Board Room Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Ohio Valley Chapter
Sunday May 4, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Room: Independence Ballroom I Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Reference and Information Services Section
Moderator: Elizabeth Lane

Sunday May 4, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Room: Conference Theater Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Self-Schedule Room

Reservation on-site only

To reserve Self-Schedule Room, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Sunday May 4, 2014 8:00am - 2:00pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Self-Schedule Room

Reservation on-site only

To reserve Self-Schedule Room, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Sunday May 4, 2014 8:00am - 6:00pm
Room: Independence Ballroom F 1000 H St NW, Washington DC 20001

9:00am

Avery User Group
A brief meeting at the conclusion of the Architecture Section meeting.

Sunday May 4, 2014 9:00am - 9:15am
Room: Arlington Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:00am

Exhibits Open
Sunday May 4, 2014 9:00am - 11:00am
Room: Independence Ballroom A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:15am

Joint Conference Task Force

By invitation only.


Sunday May 4, 2014 9:15am - 10:45am
Room: Washington Board Room Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:15am

Collaborating to Achieve
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Reaching Across the Aisle: The Library as Bridge Between Science and Art- Shannon Marie Robinson, Fine Arts Liaison Librarian, Denison University
Dr. Strangetune, or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Merge- Ann Lindell, Head, Architecture & Fine Arts Library, University of Florida
Ask the People, Serve the People: A Collaborative Assessment Project at UCLA- Allison Benedetti, Librarian for Advanced Research and Engagement, UCLA Library

Moderator:
Lyndsay Bratton, Kress Fellow in Art Librarianship, Yale University

Collaboration in higher education is becoming increasingly crucial with ever-increasing demands on resources and widening ranges of expertise. As a result, academic libraries are becoming more enterprising by finding new ways to collaborate more effectively and creatively. The three presenters in this session all faced different challenges where collaboration provided an effective means for successful innovation.

Ann Lindell, at the University of Florida will discuss the decision that was made to close the Music Library facility and merge its collections and professional staff with the Architecture & Fine Arts Library. This change involved many departments and multiple facilities and her paper will address the topics of advocacy and communication during times of change, patron activism, and strategies for managing expectations both internal and external.

Allison Benedetti will discuss how renovated space at the UCLA Library resulted in bringing in users from diverse subject areas. A team of librarians launched a multi-modal assessment project in order to better understand the complex needs of varying disciplines and students and to be proactive in addressing and scaling responses to newly arising challenges. The initiative provides an opportunity to collaborate with colleagues on campus to promote this project and guide it through to implementation.

Shannon Robinson, a fine art liaison librarian at Denison University, will discuss how she and a science liaison librarian are implementing intra-institutional collaborative activities between science and art faculty members to support the STEAM movement, which champions adding Art to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education. Successes, failures, and future efforts will be addressed, reflecting on how librarians can foster the STEM to STEAM movement at their institutions.

Sunday May 4, 2014 9:15am - 10:45am
Room: Conference Theater Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:15am

New Voices in the Profession

Sponsored by Society Circle


Moderators:

Caley Cannon, Reference Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design
Kimberly Detterbeck, Art Librarian, State University of New York at Purchase

Speakers:

The Politics of Distributed Learning: Outcomes of the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon 2014 - Siân Evans, Shared Shelf Implementation Manager, Artstor, and Jacqueline Mabey, The office of failed projects

Teaching the Hipsters: Incorporating Art and Politics into Creative Library Instruction - Diana Harter, Humanities Department Assistant, Brigham Young University

Artists’ Books DC: Developing Access, Promoting Research and Fostering Community from outside the Library - Michelle Strizever, Archivist, SEARCH, Inc.

Gerd Muehsam Award Winner:

Digital Facsimiles and the Modern Viewer: Medieval Manuscripts and Archival Practice in the Age of New Media - Jasmine Burns, MLIS Candidate and Digitization Assistant, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Returning for an eighth year, the New Voices in the Profession panel provides new Art Librarianship and Visual Resources professionals the opportunity to present topics from exceptional coursework, such as a master's thesis, or topics with which they are engaged early in their professional life. New professionals are defined as either students in MLIS or Master's programs leading to a career in librarianship or visual resources, or those 5 years post Master's level study. For many, this is their first professional speaking engagement.

This panel began at the ARLIS/NA 2006 conference in Banff and has received wide attention and praise since. Topics presented reveal new ideas, as well as different ways of thinking about established concepts, and give the conference attendees a glimpse of the academic interests and current discourses of the newest ARLIS/NA members. The New Voices session is organized by the Professional Development Committee, ArLiSNAP, and the Gerd Muehsam Award Committee.

Sunday May 4, 2014 9:15am - 10:45am
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:15am

Of, By, For the Artist: The Library as Venue for Student Creativity
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Gary Ginther, Fine Arts Librarian, Frederick & Kazuko Harris Arts Collection, Ohio University
Judy Donovan, Art Librarian, Honickman Art Library, The Barnes Foundation
Jamie Lausch Vander Broek, Learning Librarian/Exhibits and Programming Librarian, University of Michigan
Amanda H. Brown, Special Collections Instruction Librarian, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries
Megan Lotts, Art Librarian, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
Jill E. Luedke, Reference & Instruction Librarian, Art Subject Specialist / German Studies, Temple University Libraries

Moderator:
Annette Haines, Art & Design Field Librarian, Art, Architecture & Engineering Library, University of Michigan

One of our primary goals as librarians is to stimulate and engage people with our services and collections toward furthering creative and scholarly work. Traditionally we do this through library instruction, exhibits, and hosting events. One of the distinct challenges art librarians face is getting studio artists and designers through our doors. The work of an art history scholar seems more adapted to the scholarly atmosphere of quiet book stacks, but for many reasons the studio artist or designer, particularly the undergraduate student, is less inclined toward engaging with libraries. One recent phenomenon in the library world involves empowering users by giving them opportunities to shape their libraries collections through patron-driven acquisitions.

This panel session will explore ways in which art librarians use similar strategies of engagement to empower artists. Panelists will present the innovative means they have used to interact and connect with studio artists by tapping into their creative nature and empowering them to contribute their energy and unique talents toward transforming library spaces. Librarians are not just opening up the library as exhibition areas, but getting students to engage with the collections and spaces by curating exhibits from library collections, displaying library materials in conjunction with their own art and design, and using their design talents to enliven library environments. Panelists will discuss their experiences working with students, the problems they may have encountered, and ways in which librarians can encourage creative student involvement with the library to the benefit of all parties.


Sunday May 4, 2014 9:15am - 10:45am
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:15am

The Politics of Digitization: Populist Projects and the Loss of Information
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Speakers:

Deborah Kempe, Chief of Collections Management & Access, Frick Art Reference Library
Billy Parrott, Managing Librarian, The Picture Collection, New York Public Library
Patricia Fidler, Editor, Art and Architecture, Yale University Press

Moderator:
Clayton Kirking, Chief, Art Information Resources, New York Public Library

As an engorged wave of digitization washes over the library and information landscape, some in the profession find that they have weathered this tempest before. The rush to produce microfilm and discard paper originals that senior librarians experienced the 1970s and 1980s produced an enormous amount of film and sometimes created significant voids in physical print collections. The last ten years have seen an enormous rise in the popular mandate to digitize. This, coupled with the limitations posed within the disciplines of Art History, Architectural History and Design History, i.e., images, has resulted in a generalized stall of the process, especially when compared to other fields, e.g., fiction and the sciences. This "anomaly" in the field raises questions about priorities: What gets digitized and what does not? What is digitally sexy? What gets left behind? 

This session, prompted in part by the colloquium "From Wunderkammer to eResources: Promoting Art Information Across Borders in the 21st Century", held in Berlin June 13, 14, 2013, will continue discussions begun there and open the conversation to larger representation of the art library community. The session will address three primary topics: initiatives engaged in the creation of high-quality digital publications in the arts, such as catalogues raisonnés and exhibition catalogs; priorities for electronic publishing among academic presses; and, the little discussed subject of collections that are at the virtual bottom of the digitization hit list. The underlying intents here are to take the metaphorical temperature of the level of digitization in the Arts, to begin to more generally assert pressure upon the publishing industry to address the needs of the above fields, and to more aggressively identify collections that are recognized by the Society as important art historical resources collections that are at the virtual bottom of the digitization hit list.

Sunday May 4, 2014 9:15am - 10:45am
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:15am

The Politics of Diversity in the Art Library Profession

Sponsored by Society Circle


Speakers:

Charlene Maxey Harris, Associate Professor, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Mark Pompelia, Visual Resources Librarian, Fleet Library, Rhode Island School of Design
Eumie Imm-Stroukoff, Director, Research Center, Georgia O'Keeffe Museum
Jina Park, Archive Assistant at Fairchild Archive & Library, Condé Nast

Moderators:
Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez, Project Archivist, Center for the Study of Political Graphics
Kai Alexis Smith, Adjunct Reference Librarian at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center

Enrollment in arts programs are changing and slowly so are the faces of the art library profession. New art library professionals entering the field are more diverse than ever. According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) from 2007-2018, enrollment of Hispanic/Latinos in institutions of higher learning will increase by 38% and projections include 32% for American Indian/ Alaska natives, 29% for Asian/ Pacific Islanders and 26% for African Americans or Blacks. In the National Endowment for the Arts 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts, about 26% of non-Hispanic whites, 15% of Hispanics, 12 % of African Americans, and 23% of adults in other racial/ethnic categories (largely Asian Americans and Native Americans) visited an art museum or gallery in that year.

With this increase will the staff become more blended to serve the more diverse population in art libraries? What about LGBT students and professional staff? Are they represented in the art library profession? In 2012, the ALA Demographic survey indicated that approximately 11.3% of all LIS graduates claim minority status, while a 2009-2010 study showed that the total minority representation of “credentialed” librarians was 12.1%. A 2009 ARL report indicates that minorities represent 14.1% of professionals working in research libraries. What percentage pursued the art librarian track? What about the early minority art librarian pioneers? What was it like for them to break into the field? This session topic will address the history of diversity in the art library profession as well as new diversity initiatives.

Sunday May 4, 2014 9:15am - 10:45am
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

11:00am

Membership Brunch

Sponsored by Artstor, Speaker James Goode sponsored by National Museum of Women in the Arts


Prominent Washington D.C. architectural historian and author of Best Addresses (and Washington Sculpture), James M. Goode, will talk about his latest project on historic homes of Washington.

Fee:
$25




Sunday May 4, 2014 11:00am - 12:30pm
Room: Constitution Ballroom Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

12:45pm

Membership Meeting
Please join your colleagues at the annual membership meeting and show your support as the new officers of the Executive Board take office. The meeting will feature updates on society activities, a financial report, a preview of the 2015 conference in Fort Worth, Texas, a forum for discussion, and much more.

Sunday May 4, 2014 12:45pm - 1:45pm
Room: Constitution Ballroom Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

1:45pm

Exhibits Open
Sunday May 4, 2014 1:45pm - 5:45pm
Room: Independence Ballroom A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Academic Division
Moderator: Nedda Ahmed

Sunday May 4, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Conference Theater Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Art and Design School Division
Co-Moderators: Kimberly Detterbeck and Claire Gunning

Sunday May 4, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Penn Quarter A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Art Discovery group catalog/artlibraries.net open discussion
Reception sponsored by OCLC

Join the artlibraries.net committee and OCLC to celebrate the launch of Art Discovery group catalogue.  Learn more about the project and have an opportunity to ask questions. Refreshments will be served.


Organizer: artlibraries.net International Committee

Sunday May 4, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Museum Division
Moderator: Alison Hausladen

Sunday May 4, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

2:00pm

Visual Resources Division
Moderator: Annie Sollinger

Sunday May 4, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Penn Quarter B Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:00pm

Artlibraries.net International Committee Meeting
By invitation only.

Sunday May 4, 2014 3:00pm - 6:00pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:15pm

Activist Access and Outreach in Book Arts
Sponsored by George Mason University Libraries

Speakers:

Artists’ Books as Catalysts for Ecological Transformation- Mo Dawley, Art and Drama Librarian and Senior Librarian at Carnegie Mellon University
Power of the Arts to Speak: The Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Project at IUPUI- Sonja Staum-Kuniej, Director, Herron Art Library, IUPUI
Artists' Books and Zines on Wheels: How Read/Write Library Promotes Our Non-Circulating Collection- Amanda Meeks, Chicago Read/Write Library and Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Moderator:
Michelle Strizever, Archivist, SEARCH

Artists’ books are inherently radical, political objects, transforming expectations of what a book can be. Book art collections also challenge accepted bibliographic standards and subvert conventional systems of access, reference, and preservation. As librarians build and provide access to book art collections, they may also take on the subversiveness of their acquisitions.

This panel will explore the ways that librarians are practicing activist collection development, access, and outreach strategies for artists’ books. It will ask: How are librarians and curators honoring, encouraging, and building upon the radicalism of their collections? An exploration of BiblioTreka, a cargo bike that provides access to books and zines through pop-up events, a view into the collaborative, interactive, and cross-cultural Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Project, and a discussion on artists’ books as the impetus for political and environmental change will lead this conversation.

Sunday May 4, 2014 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Room: Lafayette Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

3:15pm

Empowerment by Design: Academic Libraries as Laboratories for Innovation

Sponsored by Society Circle


Speakers:

Library as Laboratory: A New Role in a Changing Landscape- Rebecca Price, Architecture, Urban Planning and Visual Resources Librarian, University of Michigan
Serving the Studio through Innovative Services- Patricia Kosco Cossard, Research Commons Librarian, University of Maryland

Moderator:
Cathryn Ziefle, Librarian, Woodbury University

Changes in academia and the museum world, driven to a large extent by a focus on budget and measurable outcomes, are requiring libraries to redefine their mission, their purposes, and their services. Many point to the increasing number of resources available online and suggest that the so-called traditional library is losing relevancy. Librarians know this to be false, but also understand that the necessary response requires a new approach to services the library can offer.

An emerging model for a repositioning of the library is that of the laboratory. Students and researchers need a place for active learning, for creating, for making, and for collaboration. Our administrators call upon us to envision a new library that provides for these activities. We are asked to develop new collections (e.g., Materials Collections), to imagine new spaces (e.g., media conversion centers, technology-rich workspaces), and to provide new services (e.g., 3-d modeling). The library is perfectly positioned to be an open laboratory for researchers and students; the resources and experts are available and the place is a neutral zone for creativity and learning. How can we embrace this new role and anticipate accompanying expectations? What are the steps necessary to move into this arena? How does the library maintain its current role fostering the research and scholarship of the individual scholar, while also addressing the needs of the collaborative group? How can you engage students and faculty in collection development? This session will frame the discussion about ways to create library services that better serve a variety of learning communities in the arts by presenting two distinctive approaches.

Sunday May 4, 2014 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:15pm

Exhibit Hall Closing Reception and Silent Auction
Sponsored by Christie's + Christie's Education, Fine Art Connoisseur, Innovative and East View Information Services 

Come enjoy a glass of wine while you put in your final bid for that item you’ve been coveting all weekend. Generously given by ARLIS/NA members, chapters, and vendors, fabulous donations of handcrafted items, books, gift cards, jewelry, photographic prints and paintings will be on display Saturday and Sunday. Start thinking about the items you will contribute, and please watch for more information about the Silent Auction on ARLIS-L! 

Auction bidding begins at 9:00 am.

If you would like to donate an item, please fill out this form.

If you have any questions, please contact one of the Silent Auction co-chairs:

Annette Haines
email: ahaines [at] umich.edu
telephone: 734-763-4438

Kimberly Lesley
email: klesley [at] uarts.edu
telephone: 215-717-6284


Sunday May 4, 2014 4:15pm - 5:45pm
Room: Independence Ballroom A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

4:30pm

New England Chapter
Sunday May 4, 2014 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

5:45pm

Yoga
Stretch with your ARLIS/NA colleagues and enjoy an energizing yoga practice lead by Deborah Ultan Boudewyns. Wear your yoga best and head to dinner with the group after this practice!


Sunday May 4, 2014 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001
 
Monday, May 5
 

7:00am

Registration & Hospitality Desk Open
Monday May 5, 2014 7:00am - 10:00am
Room: McPherson Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

Self-Schedule Room

Reservation on-site only

To reserve Self-Schedule Room, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Monday May 5, 2014 8:00am - 9:00am
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

The Art + Politics of Contributing to Wikipedia
Instructors:
Sara Snyder, Information Technology Specialist, Archives of American Art
Dominic McDevitt-Parks, Wikimedia DC, National Archives and Records Administration

When the results of a web search on nearly any topic include a Wikipedia page, frequently as the number one result, how can institutions ensure that their digital resources remain relevant? Organizations like libraries, archives, and museums continue to share their collections and expertise online, but many struggle with questions about how they can provide greater context and reach broader audiences. How should they understand and relate to Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia, and the online community of volunteers that crowdsource its contents?

To begin to addressing these questions, an increasing number of organizations around the globe--including the Smithsonian Institution and the National Archives and Records Administration--have begun partnering with the Wikipedia online community, working together to improve encyclopedia entries relating to their collections. This workshop will introduce participants to the world behind Wikipedia: the community of volunteers who create and edit articles, and who protect the site against vandalism and copyright violations. With hands-on training and lots of interactivity, participants will gain 21st century information literacy skills and technical skills that they will immediately be able to put into practice.They will also have the chance to form valuable new interpersonal connections among the network of librarians, archivists, and cultural professionals who are also Wikipedia contributors.

Maximum Participants: 30

Fee: $50


Monday May 5, 2014 8:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Farragut Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

8:00am

World War II Provenance Research: Methods and Resources
Sponsored by Washington Art Library Resources Committee (WALRC)

Instructors:

Nancy H. Yeide, Head, Department of Curatorial Records, National Gallery of Art
Victoria Reed, Sadler Curator for Provenance, Museumof Fine  Arts, Boston
Chris Naylor, Director of Textual Records, Research Services, National Archives and Records Administration
Megan Lewis, Reference Librarian, Library and Archives, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Marisa Bourgoin, Chief of Reference Services, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
Barbara Aikens, Chief, Collections Processing, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

Directed by Nancy H. Yeide (Head, Department of Curatorial Records, National Gallery of Art), this workshop will provide introductory training in provenance research methods and resources related to art and other cultural property looted during the Nazi era in Germany and surrounding countries. The workshop will be tailored to meet the needs of art librarians and archivists, and will present practical and specific information regarding a broad range of provenance research resources, including online sources such as the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) and the Munich Central Collecting Point databases. Key archival collections, including those held by the American Archives of Art, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), will also be discussed.

Case studies will be presented to help illustrate the complexities of researching provenance between 1933 and 1945. Each workshop participant will receive a copy of Nancy Yeide’s Beyond the Dreams of Avarice: the Hermann Goering Collection, compliments of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art and Robert M. Edsel.

Maximum Participants: 40

Fee: $65 (includes book)

Transportation: Attendees are responsible for their own transportation to/from the workshop location which is 0.2 miles from the Grand Hyatt hotel. Walking and taxi are both viable options. Specific instructions (including maps) will be provided via e-mail to those who registered for this workshop. If you have questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.

Monday May 5, 2014 8:00am - 12:00pm
Archives of American Art 750 9th Street NW, Suite 2200, Washington DC

8:45am

Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation
We are excited to provide a unique opportunity for ARLISians: Library of Congress’s Packard Campus for the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in Culpeper, Virginia. Located 90 minutes from DC, the tour will be an in-depth, behind the scenes look at this state-of-the art Audio-Visual Conservation center. At the Packard Campus the Library of Congress acquires, preserves and provides access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of films, television programs, radio broadcasts, and sound recordings. The tour of the campus will include the cold storage vaults, the robots that facilitate the video digitization, massive data storage facilities, and the conservation labs. A 206-seat theater houses a state-of-the-art projection booth capable of showing everything from nitrate film to modern digital cinema. Box lunches will be served at the Packard Campus.

Maximum Participants: 25

Fee: $75, includes lunch

Accessibility: All participants will be on their feet (walking /standing) for the duration of the tour.

Transportation: Transportation will be by bus. Loading and unloading takes place at the hotel’s 10th Street NW entrance, on 10th Street NW between H Street NW and G Street NW. The bus for this tour will leave at 8:45am. Please meet the tour shepherd near the 10th street hotel entrance 15 minutes prior to departure.

Monday May 5, 2014 8:45am - 4:30pm
Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation 19053 Mt Pony Rd, Culpeper, VA

9:00am

CPAC Debrief meeting
Monday May 5, 2014 9:00am - 10:00am
Room: Penn Quarter A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:00am

Artlibraries.net International Committee Meeting
By invitation only.

Monday May 5, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

9:00am

Federal Reserve Board Art Collection and the Diplomatic Reception Rooms at the Department of State
**REGISTRATION FOR THIS TOUR IS FULL** (4/25/2014)

Please note: Social Security Numbers will be collected ahead of the conference due to Homeland Security regulations. Once registered, you will be contacted by phone to securely capture this information. Thank you for your compliance.

Attendees will travel to two government institutions to view their fine and decorative art collections. Participants will begin the tour at the Federal Reserve Board where participants will learn about the architectural history of the Marriner S. Eccles building, the Fine Arts Program, and will view highlights from the art collection. The Fine Arts Program has organized more than 150 special exhibitions to highlight individual artists, art movements, and thematic trends. The Federal Reserve Board’s Fine Arts Program was established in 1975 by former Chairman Arthur F. Burns in response to a White House directive encouraging federal partnership with the arts. The Board’s growing collection consists of more than 1,000 works of art, including drawings, paintings, photographs, prints, and sculptures. No government funds are used to purchase art. All of the works have been either donated or purchased with funds given by private citizens expressly for the purpose of art acquisition.

The next stop will be across the street at the Diplomatic Reception Rooms of the Department of State, which are used for official functions hosted by the Secretary of State and other government officials. The Diplomatic Rooms hold a premier collection of early 18th and 19th century American furniture, paintings and decorative arts, reputed to be one of the top ten collections from the time of our country’s founding and of its formative years. The museum-caliber collection boasts more than 5,000 objects from the period of 1750-1825. Participants will be treated to a tour of the rooms and their objects.

Please note: Participants on this tour will travel by bus to The Federal Reserve Board and to the Diplomatic Rooms at the Department of State. Costs associated with this tour cover bus transportation. On Friday, May 2 a tour to the Diplomatic Rooms of the Department of State will be offered, however, participants will take Metro, and will walk approximately ½ mile to/from the Department of State. Because no transportation is being furnished for the May 2 tour, participants will only need to pay for Metro transportation.  No Social Security numbers will be collected for the May 2 tour. 

Maximum Participants: 20

Fee: $25

Accessibility: Walking and standing.

Transportation: Transportation via bus. The bus for this tour will leave at 8:45am. Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby 15 minutes prior to departure.

Monday May 5, 2014 9:00am - 12:00pm
Federal Reserve Board and the Department of State 20th Street and Constitution Ave NW, Washington, District of Columbia ‎

9:00am

Classic and Modern: Mount Vernon and the Pope-Leighey House
George Washington's Mount Vernon and Woodlawn Plantation (which contains Frank Lloyd Wright’s Pope-Leighey House) will be a treat for history, decorative arts, and architecture buffs.

The tour begins at Woodlawn Plantation which was originally part of Mount Vernon. In 1799 George Washington gave the site to his nephew Lawrence Lewis and Lewis’ new bride, Eleanor “Nelly” Parke Custis, Martha Washington’s granddaughter. The newly-married couple built the Georgian/Federal house which was designed by William Thornton, architect of the U.S. Capitol. The first site operated by the National Trust, Woodlawn Plantation has operated as a historic house museum since 1949. Built in 1940, the Pope-Leighey House is a Usonian home, one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s homes for the common man. Commissioned by a journalist and built in nearby Falls Church, the house was given to the National Trust and moved to Woodlawn Plantation to avoid the expansion path of Highway 66.

There will be a guided tour of both the Plantation and the Pope-Leighey House, the latter focusing on the architectural elements of the house. The group will then travel to Mount Vernon where guests can visit Washington’s Tomb, the gardens and restored landscapes, and the education center. The group will eat lunch on their own in Mt. Vernon's food court. After lunch the group will have the opportunity to tour the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon, a 45,000 square foot Library which opened its doors in September 2013.  In the tradition of the Presidential Libraries, the FWS Library holds many of the personal papers, maps, and books previously owned by George Washington. During the tour visitors will see the Karen Buchwald Wright Reading Room, The John and Adrienne Mars Rare Books and Manuscripts Room, and The David Rubenstein Leadership Hall. There will be an opportunity to talk with Library staff about current operations and future initiatives. The tour will be led by Chief Librarian and Archivist, Mark Santangelo. At 3pm there will be a docent-led tour of the mansion and its grounds for participants.

Maximum Participants: 60

Fee: $75

Accessibility: All participants will be walking or standing for the duration of the tour. There are stairs, ramps, and elevators, and limited seating in galleries. There are benches at Mt. Vernon in outside locations.

Transportation: Transportation will be by bus. Loading and unloading takes place at the hotel’s 10th Street NW entrance, on 10th Street NW between H Street NW and G Street NW. Please meet the tour shepherd near the 10th street hotel entrance 15 minutes prior to departure.


Monday May 5, 2014 9:00am - 6:00pm
Mount Vernon and Woodlawn Plantation 3200 Mt Vernon Memorial Hwy, Alexandria, VA ‎

9:30am

A Capitol Tour
**REGISTRATION FOR THIS TOUR IS FULL** (4/25/2014)

The tour of the Capitol Building include areas that are not part of the standard Capitol tour. Highlights include the recently restored Brumidi Corridors, Old Senate Chamber, and Old Supreme Court Chamber. Also discussed will be the Senate Collection of paintings and sculpture (portraits of senators, statesmen, and paintings of historic events) displayed around the building.

Maximum Participants:
30

Fee: Free

Accessibility: Walking and standing.

Transportation: Transportation will be by Metro's Blue line train from Metro Center to South Capitol station. Fare is $1.70 or $2.10 each way depending on rush hour. Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby 15 minutes prior to departure.


Monday May 5, 2014 9:30am - 12:00pm
U.S. Capitol Building First St SE, Washington, DC ‎

10:00am

Local Libraries Open House
Several Washington DC libraries will hold an Open House on Monday, May 5 so that ARLIS/NA attendees will be able to drop by and view special collections and exhibits. All participating libraries are within a two-mile radius of each other and are easily accessed by public transportation. Participating libraries will display art-related materials such as collections of artist books, Fine Press collections, Fine arts, Artist file materials, and memorabilia. Participating institutions include the Folger Shakespeare Library, Freer/Sackler Gallery Library, Hirshhorn Museum Library, Library of Congress, National Gallery of Art Library, National Museum of African Art Library, National Museum of Women in the Arts Library, Smithsonian American Art Museum and National Portrait Gallery Library, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Library.

Fee:
Free

A map and guide to the Local Libraries Open House will be available online and onsite at the ARLIS 2014 conference registration desk.  

Monday May 5, 2014 10:00am - 1:00pm
Various off site locations

10:00am

ARLIS/NA Executive Board post-conference meeting
Monday May 5, 2014 10:00am - 1:30pm
Room: Penn Quarter A Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

12:00pm

Self-Schedule Room

Reservation on-site only

To reserve Self-Schedule Room, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Monday May 5, 2014 12:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001

12:30pm

National Gallery of Art Conservation Labs
**REGISTRATION FOR THIS TOUR IS FULL** (4/25/2014)

The National Gallery of Art was conceived and given to the people of the United States by Andrew W. Mellon, a financier and art collector from Pittsburgh who came to Washington in 1921 to serve as secretary of the treasury. Mellon’s art collection and a sizeable endowment established the NGA in 1937.  The Gallery’s principal duty is to keep its collections and the facilities that house them intact and in optimum condition for future generations. To carry out this responsibility, the Gallery maintains effective programs of security, environmental control, buildings maintenance, and conservation. To support the vast and varied collections, Conservation labs for Paper, Photographs, and Textiles were established as part of the National Gallery of Art. Attendees for this tour will be taken on a behind the scenes tour to view the Paper, Photograph, and Textile conservation labs.  This includes Conservation labs focusing on paintings, works on paper, photographs, textiles, and sculpture.

Maximum Participants: 20

Fee: Free

Accessibility: Walking and standing

Transportation: Transportation will be by Metro Bus, P6 route. Fare is $3.20 ($1.60 each way). Please meet the tour shepherd near the shoe shine stand in the hotel lobby at 15 minutes prior to departure.

Monday May 5, 2014 12:30pm - 3:00pm
National Gallery of Art 6th and Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC ‎

3:00pm

Getty Portal Advisory Group
By invitation only.

Monday May 5, 2014 3:00pm - 6:00pm
Room: Franklin Square Grand Hyatt 1000 H Street NW, Washington DC 20001